We Have A Problem: Crisis and Reputation Management in the Digital Age

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Crisis communications and crisis management are terms often used in the corporate world but rarely understood. In the era of social media, crisis is compounded by the entry of a loud and often powerful player, the public. “We have a problem” is the first book written in Asia about contemporary corporate crisis. The title is as much a declaration of crisis as the book is a collective wisdom of solutions to unfortunate yet common events that happen to big and small businesses. The book uses five local and five foreign case studies to illustrate crisis communications and management at its worst and at its best.

Creator of Today newspaper PN Balji, founder of Channel NewsAsia Woon Tai Ho, social media guru Keith Nakamura, and litigation lawyer Eugene Quah reveal the most important secrets and strategies used to rescue companies in crisis, and discuss the opportunities lost by those who did not understand the value of speed and sincerity in this digital age. Why is deleting a crisis post on social media a bad idea? Why is it important to empower every member of your staff to prepare for crisis? This team of writers know how to win, not just in the court of law, but also in the court of public opinion. Learn why it is prudent to get your holding statements endorsed by your legal team before a crisis happens. And what emergency action you must take when netizens snap compromising photographs of your backend production, whether it is repacking soya bean milk and labelling as “freshly prepared” or naming buns after a recently deceased head of state. And then, how do you say sorry in action, not in words? A tale of two Tonys, the CEO of AirAsia and the CEO of BP: how was Tony Fernandes a leader, and why was Tony Hayward not.

“We have a problem” is the protection you need for your business reputation in this digital age. Skilfully managing the perception of a crisis determines the difference between a company’s life and death, because in the pitched battle between perception and reality, perception always wins.
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About the author

Woon Tai Ho is the Chief Executive Officer for RHT Digital & Media. He is a veteran media practitioner, TV producer, art collector and writer, and also the founder of Channel NewsAsia.

P N Balji is the Non-Executive Director for RHT Digital & Media. He is a veteran Singaporean journalist who is the former chief editor of TODAY newspaper, and a media consultant.

Eugene Quah is a Partner in the Litigation & Dispute Resolution department at RHTLaw Taylor Wessing.

Keith Nakamura is the Director of Digital Strategy at RHT Digital & Media.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Candid Creation Publishing
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Pages
172
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ISBN
9789811108549
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Public Relations
Education / Counseling / Crisis Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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The Art of Public Speaking is a fantastic introduction to public speaking by the master of the art, Dale Carnegie. Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. It is closely allied to "presenting", although the latter has more of a commercial connotation.

In public speaking, as in any form of communication, there are five basic elements, often expressed as "who is saying what to whom using what medium with what effects?" The purpose of public speaking can range from simply transmitting information, to motivating people to act, to simply telling a story. Good orators should be able to change the emotions of their listeners, not just inform them. Public speaking can also be considered a discourse community. Interpersonal communication and public speaking have several components that embrace such things as motivational speaking, leadership/personal development, business, customer service, large group communication, and mass communication. Public speaking can be a powerful tool to use for purposes such as motivation, influence, persuasion, informing, translation, or simply entertaining. A confident speaker is more likely to use this as excitement and create effective speech thus increasing their overall ethos.

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (originally Carnagey until 1922 and possibly somewhat later) (November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer, lecturer, and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking, and interpersonal skills. Born in poverty on a farm in Missouri, he was the author of How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936), a massive bestseller that remains popular today. He also wrote How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948), Lincoln the Unknown (1932), and several other books.

Perhaps one of Carnegie’s most successful marketing moves was to change the spelling of his last name from “Carnagey” to Carnegie, at a time when Andrew Carnegie (unrelated) was a widely revered and recognized name. By 1916, Dale was able to rent Carnegie Hall itself for a lecture to a packed house. Carnegie's first collection of his writings was Public Speaking: a Practical Course for Business Men (1926), later entitled Public Speaking and Influencing Men in Business (1932). His crowning achievement, however, was when Simon & Schuster published How to Win Friends and Influence People. The book was a bestseller from its debut in 1936, in its 17th printing within a few months. By the time of Carnegie's death, the book had sold five million copies in 31 languages, and there had been 450,000 graduates of his Dale Carnegie Institute. It has been stated in the book that he had critiqued over 150,000 speeches in his participation in the adult education movement of the time. During World War I he served in the U.S. Army.

One of the core ideas in his books is that it is possible to change other people's behavior by changing one's reaction to them.
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