Curriculum and Assessment

Greenwood Publishing Group
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Curriculum and Assessment is the first volume of a new series International Perspectives on Curriculum. This edited book examines the relationship between curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, and, as with subsequent volumes, adopts a cross-sector and comparative approach. Contributors make reference to a number of important debates in the fields of curriculum and assessment: summative versus formative assessment; differentiation versus inclusion; psychometric versus holistic theorising; decontextualised versus contextualised assessment; symbol-processing versus situated learning approaches; integrated versus connected assessment; and high stakes versus low stakes assessment. The rationale for this volume is not to reach an agreement about assessment and curriculum frameworks, but to air the various debates referred to above and develop new frameworks for understanding these important issues.

This volume and the series is timely as administrators and policy-makers in different parts of the world have taken an increased interest in education, and as moves to centralise curriculum provision have gathered pace. This has in some cases driven a wedge between curriculum theory and curriculum practice, as policy-makers have developed and implemented proposals without referring to academic debates about these issues. It therefore is an important task to reassert the need to discuss and debate the curriculum in a critical manner before implementation occurs. This volume sets about that task, addressing policy-makers, administrators, teachers and the research community.

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About the author

DAVID SCOTT is a Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Curriculum and Teaching Studies at the Open University in the United Kingdom. He has published widely in the fields of curriculum, assessment and research methodology. His most recent books include Reading Educational Research and Literacy, Realism and Educational Research: New Perspectives and Possibilities and (with Robin Usher) Researching Education. Data, Methods and Theory in Educational Enquiry. He is the current editor of The Curriculum Journal.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Greenwood Publishing Group
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Published on
Dec 31, 2001
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Pages
190
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ISBN
9781567505207
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Curricula
Education / Testing & Measurement
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Catholic faith is not a set of rules or a body of doctrines, but is a way of life, writes David Scott. It's a lived faith that contains convincing, intellectually coherent, and spiritually fulfilling answers to the biggest questions: Who is God? Who is Jesus? Why are we here? Where are we going? The Catholic Passion invites readers into a conversation about the things that matter most. It is not an argument for the Catholic faith but a journey to the heart of it—a richly rewarding reflection on prayer, the Bible, sacraments, the church, and God-made-human in Jesus Christ.
Scott does not tell the story of the faith through church documents or cate­chism quotations. Instead, he looks at the faith experience of real Catholics—people like the American writer Andre Dubus, the French composer Olivier Messiaen, the Chinese human rights activist Henry Wu, the French martyr Charles de Foucauld, and the American reformer Dorothy Day. These and other Catholics embody a faith that warms the heart as it enlightens the mind.
One theme emerges from Scott's reflections on the lives of Catholics and the Scriptures: God's passion of love for humankind burns on in the Catholic Church. The Catholic passion is the conviction that there is nothing God will not do to win our love.
"The Catholic Passion is a monumental work. David Scott weaves material from scripture, history, the arts, the liturgy, theology, spirituality, and personal reflection, showing us that nothing human is alien to Christ—and nothing divine is withheld from God's people."
—Scott Hahn, author of The Lamb's Supper
"The Catholic Passion is a masterwork—beautiful, compelling, and wonderfully readable; an outstanding portrait of what Catholics believe and why. I highly recommend it."
—Charles J. Chaput, OFM Cap, archbishop of Denver
"David Scott helps us see a vibrant Catholicism that offers brilliant meaning in a world darkened by materialism and violence. He presents a vision that allows the treasures of the past to envision an orthodox Catholicism for the future."
—Fr. Mitch Pacwa, SJ, EWTN
How do other countries create “smarter” kids? What is it like to be a child in the world’s new education superpowers? The Smartest Kids in the World “gets well beneath the glossy surfaces of these foreign cultures and manages to make our own culture look newly strange....The question is whether the startling perspective provided by this masterly book can also generate the will to make changes” (The New York Times Book Review).

In a handful of nations, virtually all children are learning to make complex arguments and solve problems they’ve never seen before. They are learning to think, in other words, and to thrive in the modern economy. Inspired to find answers for our own children, author and Time magazine journalist Amanda Ripley follows three Americans embed­ded in these countries for one year. Kim, fifteen, raises $10,000 so she can move from Oklahoma to Finland; Eric, eighteen, trades his high-achieving Minnesota suburb for a booming city in South Korea; and Tom, seventeen, leaves a historic Pennsylvania village for Poland.

Through these young informants, Ripley meets battle-scarred reformers, sleep-deprived zombie students, and a teacher who earns $4 million a year. Their stories, along with groundbreaking research into learning in other cultures, reveal a pattern of startling transformation: none of these countries had many “smart” kids a few decades ago. Things had changed. Teaching had become more rigorous; parents had focused on things that mattered; and children had bought into the promise of education.
At this stalled and disillusioned juncture in postcolonial history—when many anticolonial utopias have withered into a morass of exhaustion, corruption, and authoritarianism—David Scott argues the need to reconceptualize the past in order to reimagine a more usable future. He describes how, prior to independence, anticolonialists narrated the transition from colonialism to postcolonialism as romance—as a story of overcoming and vindication, of salvation and redemption. Scott contends that postcolonial scholarship assumes the same trajectory, and that this imposes conceptual limitations. He suggests that tragedy may be a more useful narrative frame than romance. In tragedy, the future does not appear as an uninterrupted movement forward, but instead as a slow and sometimes reversible series of ups and downs.

Scott explores the political and epistemological implications of how the past is conceived in relation to the present and future through a reconsideration of C. L. R. James’s masterpiece of anticolonial history, The Black Jacobins, first published in 1938. In that book, James told the story of Toussaint L’Ouverture and the making of the Haitian Revolution as one of romantic vindication. In the second edition, published in the United States in 1963, James inserted new material suggesting that that story might usefully be told as tragedy. Scott uses James’s recasting of The Black Jacobins to compare the relative yields of romance and tragedy. In an epilogue, he juxtaposes James’s thinking about tragedy, history, and revolution with Hannah Arendt’s in On Revolution. He contrasts their uses of tragedy as a means of situating the past in relation to the present in order to derive a politics for a possible future.

The Catholic faith is not a set of rules or a body of doctrines, but is a way of life, writes David Scott. It's a lived faith that contains convincing, intellectually coherent, and spiritually fulfilling answers to the biggest questions: Who is God? Who is Jesus? Why are we here? Where are we going? The Catholic Passion invites readers into a conversation about the things that matter most. It is not an argument for the Catholic faith but a journey to the heart of it—a richly rewarding reflection on prayer, the Bible, sacraments, the church, and God-made-human in Jesus Christ.
Scott does not tell the story of the faith through church documents or cate­chism quotations. Instead, he looks at the faith experience of real Catholics—people like the American writer Andre Dubus, the French composer Olivier Messiaen, the Chinese human rights activist Henry Wu, the French martyr Charles de Foucauld, and the American reformer Dorothy Day. These and other Catholics embody a faith that warms the heart as it enlightens the mind.
One theme emerges from Scott's reflections on the lives of Catholics and the Scriptures: God's passion of love for humankind burns on in the Catholic Church. The Catholic passion is the conviction that there is nothing God will not do to win our love.
"The Catholic Passion is a monumental work. David Scott weaves material from scripture, history, the arts, the liturgy, theology, spirituality, and personal reflection, showing us that nothing human is alien to Christ—and nothing divine is withheld from God's people."
—Scott Hahn, author of The Lamb's Supper
"The Catholic Passion is a masterwork—beautiful, compelling, and wonderfully readable; an outstanding portrait of what Catholics believe and why. I highly recommend it."
—Charles J. Chaput, OFM Cap, archbishop of Denver
"David Scott helps us see a vibrant Catholicism that offers brilliant meaning in a world darkened by materialism and violence. He presents a vision that allows the treasures of the past to envision an orthodox Catholicism for the future."
—Fr. Mitch Pacwa, SJ, EWTN
Growing up on either side of the Iron Curtain, David Scott and Alexei Leonov experienced very different childhoods but shared the same dream to fly.

Excelling in every area of mental and physical agility, Scott and Leonov became elite fighter pilots and were chosen by their countries' burgeoning space programs to take part in the greatest technological race ever-to land a man on the moon.

In this unique dual autobiography, astronaut Scott and cosmonaut Leonov recount their exceptional lives and careers spent on the cutting edge of science and space exploration. With each mission fraught with perilous risks, and each space program touched by tragedy, these parallel tales of adventure and heroism read like a modern-day thriller. Cutting fast between their differing recollections, this book reveals, in a very personal way, the drama of one of the most ambitious contests ever embarked on by man, set against the conflict that once held the world in suspense: the clash between Russian communism and Western democracy.

Before training to be the USSR's first man on the moon, Leonov became the first man to walk in space. It was a feat that won him a place in history but almost cost him his life. A year later, in 1966, Gemini 8, with David Scott and Neil Armstrong aboard, tumbled out of control across space. Surviving against dramatic odds-a split-second decision by pilot Armstrong saved their lives-they both went on to fly their own lunar missions: Armstrong to command Apollo 11 and become the first man to walk on the moon, and Scott to perform an EVA during the Apollo 9 mission and command the most complex expedition in the history of exploration, Apollo 15. Spending three days on the moon, Scott became the seventh man to walk on its breathtaking surface.

Marking a new age of USA/USSR cooperation, the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project brought Scott and Leonov together, finally ending the Cold War silence and building a friendship that would last for decades.

Their courage, passion for exploration, and determination to push themselves to the limit emerge in these memoirs not only through their triumphs but also through their perseverance in times of extraordinary difficulty and danger.

Paradise Lost remains as challenging and relevant today as it was in the turbulent intellectual and political environment in which it was written. This edition aims to bring the poem as fully alive to a modern reader as it would have been to Milton's contemporaries. It provides a newly edited text of the 1674 edition of the poem--the last of Milton's lifetime--with carefully modernized spelling and punctuation. Marginal glosses define unfamiliar words, and extensive annotations at the foot of the page clarify Milton's syntax and poetics, and explore the range of literary, biblical, and political allusions that point to his major concerns. David Kastan's lively Introduction considers the central interpretative issues raised by the poem, demonstrating how thoroughly it engaged the most vital--and contested--issues of Milton's time, and which reveal themselves as no less vital, and perhaps no less contested, today.

The edition also includes an essay on the text, a chronology of major events in Milton's life, and a selected bibliography, as well as the first known biography of Milton, written by Edward Phillips in 1694.

 

" . . .an exemplary job both of presenting the major topics of Paradise Lost and of entering the selva oscura of Milton criticism. . . . Students and scholars alike will appreciate the balanced approach to the complexities, difficulties, and conundrums of Milton's poem and the criticism on it.  Kastan's prose is not just lively but chiseled, and it is destined to affect students." --Patrick Cheney, Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900

 
"Kastan is an exemplary editor, attuned to emerging critical currents, yet steeped in the scholarship of an earlier tradition, aware of the text's provenance and reception, alert to its topicality.  His introduction, a model of theoretically informed, politically committed, historically grounded criticism, makes this edition of Paradise Lost all you would expect from one of the most erudite and perceptive figures in the field." --Willy Maley, Modern Language Review
The world is on an inexorable path toward the apocalypse, currently exhibiting many of the Bibles prophesied signs of the end times. When the Jews regained nationhood in May 1948, the countdown began toward the promised return of the Messiah. In Fifty Signs of the End Times, compelling new information is shared demonstrating that the end-time clock is nearing midnight, including: How the alignment of the nations soon to come against Israel is exactly as prophesied in the Bible.
The many ways that God has honored His promise to richly bless Israel in the latter days including the discovery of new energy sources.
Recent and detailed information concerning the coming Tribulation Temple.
Amazing accounts demonstrating how God is pouring out His Spirit in these latter days.
How God has miraculously protected Israel in its recent wars.
Revealing how twelve of Christs prophecies in His Olivet Discourse have come true in our time.

Dr. David Nichols explains these intriguing signs, and dozens more, in meticulous detail. We are fast approaching Armageddon. However, this need not cause alarm. God has provided an escape.


I have well over fifty prophecy volumes in my library and can honestly say that none display more of the detailed and accurate research as seen in this book. Every prophecy student worth his salt needs to read it!
---Dr. H.L. Willmington, Founder and Dean, Liberty Home Bible Institute

David Nichols has written an excellent study on the signs of the end times. His biblical knowledge, medical and scientific perspective, and analysis of the culture make this an incredible study. Dont miss it.
---Dr. Ed Hindson, Asst. Chancellor, Liberty University; Host of The King is Coming

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