Social and Cultural Dynamics

Social and Cultural Dynamics

Book 1
Transaction Publishers
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Publisher
Transaction Publishers
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Published on
Dec 31, 1962
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Pages
2912
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ISBN
9781412834230
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Language
English
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This content is DRM protected.
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This classic work is a revised and abridged version, in a single volume, of the work which more than any other catapulted Pitirim Sorokin into being one of the most famed figures of twentieth-century sociology. Its original publication occurred before World War II. This revised version, written some twenty years later, reflects a postwar environment. Earlier than most, Sorokin took the consequences of the breakdown of colonialism into account in discussing the renaissance of the great cultures of African and Asian civilization. Other than perhaps F.S.C. Northrop, no individual better incorporated the new role of the Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and Arabic peoples in this postwar world.

Sorokin came to view social and cultural dynamics in terms of three major processes: a major shift of mankind's creative center from Europe to the Pacific; a progressive disintegration of the sensate culture; and finally the first blush of the emergence and growth of a new idealistic sociocultural order. This volume is perhaps most famous for revealing Sorokin's remarkable efforts to understand the relationship of war and peace to the process of social and political change. Contrary to received wisdom, he shows that the magnitude and depth of war grows in periods of social, cultural, and territorial expansion by the nation. In short, war is just as often a function of development as it is of social decay.

This long-unavailable volume remains one of the major touchstones by which we can judge efforts to create an international social science. There are few areas of social or cultural life that are not covered—from painting, art, and music, to the ethos of universalism and particularism. These are terms which Sorokin introduced into the literature long before the rise of functional doctrines. For all those interested in cultural and historical processes, this volume provides the essence of Sorokin's remarkably prescient effort to achieve sociological transcendence, by takin

The development of industry in Europe and the United States has resulted in great marvels of production. However, non-Western nations, with a few exceptions, have not yet shared fully in this productivity, despite the desires of their leaders to do so. Also, in the United States, and in other industrial nations, there are sizeable minority groups which have not been fully assimilated into the productive pattern of the majority. Most live as poverty enclaves within the greater society. This socioeconomic imbalance has contributed to unrest in both the agrarian and industrial nations.Introducing Social Change deals with numerous topics of social change: cultural problems of change in general; a description of the concept of culture; a discussion of cultural change in its various forms; an introduction to the process of directed change; a discussion of the motivation necessary to bring about change; a treatment of the method of adapting an innovation to existing ideas and customs; the profile of the primary characteristics of most developing nations; the main characteristics and cultural values of America as a sample urban, industrial culture; and field problems of the change agent, and in particular those methods from anthropology that can be modified for use.Developments in the industrial countries, particularly the United States, have demonstrated the need for this second edition. When the original version was produced, little thought or activity was given to development efforts among ethnic minorities of industrial countries. Development was thought of almost exclusively as an activity relevant to the developing, non-industrial nations. It has become apparent that ethnic groups in industrial nations are also in need of economic development. Government policies, including funding, have been increasingly pointed in this direction.
This classic work is a revised and abridged version, in a single volume, of the work which more than any other catapulted Pitirim Sorokin into being one of the most famed figures of twentieth-century sociology. Its original publication occurred before World War II. This revised version, written some twenty years later, reflects a postwar environment. Earlier than most, Sorokin took the consequences of the breakdown of colonialism into account in discussing the renaissance of the great cultures of African and Asian civilization. Other than perhaps F.S.C. Northrop, no individual better incorporated the new role of the Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and Arabic peoples in this postwar world.

Sorokin came to view social and cultural dynamics in terms of three major processes: a major shift of mankind's creative center from Europe to the Pacific; a progressive disintegration of the sensate culture; and finally the first blush of the emergence and growth of a new idealistic sociocultural order. This volume is perhaps most famous for revealing Sorokin's remarkable efforts to understand the relationship of war and peace to the process of social and political change. Contrary to received wisdom, he shows that the magnitude and depth of war grows in periods of social, cultural, and territorial expansion by the nation. In short, war is just as often a function of development as it is of social decay.

This long-unavailable volume remains one of the major touchstones by which we can judge efforts to create an international social science. There are few areas of social or cultural life that are not covered—from painting, art, and music, to the ethos of universalism and particularism. These are terms which Sorokin introduced into the literature long before the rise of functional doctrines. For all those interested in cultural and historical processes, this volume provides the essence of Sorokin's remarkably prescient effort to achieve sociological transcendence, by takin

Throughout the Cold War, both the United States and the Soviet Union viewed themselves as saviors of the world, and each saw itself as working on behalf of humanity against the other. The unexpected implosion of the Soviet empire in 1989 brought an end to this bipolar world and left both nations uncertain about their relations to the world and to each other. Antagonism between the United States and Russia is rooted in a lack of knowledge of each other's culture and history. This pioneering volume, first published in 1944 at the height of the U.S.-Soviet alliance, steers us through the labyrinth of mutual ignorance that continues in the post-Cold War era.

Pitirim Alexandrovitch Sorokin is one of the major figures of modern sociology. Born in rural Russia in 1889, he took an active part in the country's political life. Following his emigration to the United States, he strove to develop an insider's knowledge of his new home. Russia and the United States was written in the hope of fostering cooperation between the two countries in the postwar world. By noting a shared belief in each nation's historical role or "exceptionalism," Sorokin argues that there is a fundamental compatibility in the basic values of the two countries, facilitated by shared mental, cultural, and social attitudes that preceded the communist period.

Without minimizing the tyrannical nature of the Soviet regime, Sorokin locates and traces the development of democratic tendencies in Russia. He also points out that American democracy has not been fully achieved and that both nations have yet to fulfill their ideals. Both countries have been melting pots of diverse racial, ethnic, national, and cultural groups and peoples, and from their multiethnic composition, Russia and the United States have each developed a rich and creative culture. Sorokin rejects the notion of diametrically opposed American and Russian "souls," in favor of an appreciation of shared values.

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