The Six-Day War of 1899: Hong Kong in the Age of Imperialism

Hong Kong University Press
Free sample

In 1899, a year after the Convention of Peking leased the New Territories to Britain, the British moved to establish control. This triggered resistance by the some of the population of the New Territories. There ensued six days of fighting with heavy Chinese casualties. This truly forgotten war has been thoroughly researched for the first time and recounted in lively style by Patrick Hase, an expert on the people and history of the New Territories.
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About the author

Patrick H. Hase (PhD, Cambridge, FSA, Hon.FRASHK) has studied the history and traditional life of the New Territories and its people for much of the 36 years he has lived in Hong Kong. His local historical research has led to his appointment as an Honorary Advisor to the Leisure and Cultural Services Department, Hong Kong, to the Zhong-ying Street Historical Museum, Shataukok, and to the People's Government of Kaiping Municipality. He is the author of numerous articles on local New Territories history.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Hong Kong University Press
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Published on
Jan 1, 2008
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Pages
276
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ISBN
9789622098992
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / China
History / Military / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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