The Science and Psychology of Music Performance: Creative Strategies for Teaching and Learning

Oxford University Press
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What type of practice makes a musician perfect? What sort of child is most likely to succeed on a musical instrument? What practice strategies yield the fastest improvement in skills such as sight-reading, memorization, and intonation? Scientific and psychological research can offer answers to these and other questions that musicians face every day. In The Science and Psychology of Music Performance, Richard Parncutt and Gary McPherson assemble relevant current research findings and make them accessible to musicians and music educators. This book describes new approaches to teaching music, learning music, and making music at all educational and skill levels. Each chapter represents the collaboration between a music researcher (usually a music psychologist) and a performer or music educator. This combination of expertise results in excellent practical advice. Readers will learn, for example, that they are in the majority (57%) if they experience rapid heartbeat before performances; the chapter devoted to performance anxiety will help them decide whether beta-blocker medication, hypnotherapy, or the Alexander Technique of relaxation might alleviate their stage fright. Another chapter outlines a step-by-step method for introducing children to musical notation, firmly based on research in cognitive development. Altogether, the 21 chapters cover the personal, environmental, and acoustical influences that shape the learning and performance of music.
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About the author

Richard Parncutt is associate professor of systematic musicology at the University of Graz. He is the author of Harmony: A Psychoaccoustical Approach, and many research articles on the perception of harmony, tonality, and rhythm. He is also an internationally experienced pianist and piano teacher. Gary McPherson is associate professor of music education at the University of New South Wales. He has served as treasurer of the International Society for Music Education and national president of the Australian Society for Music Education. As a trumpeter, he has performed with several of Australia's leading ensembles.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
Apr 18, 2002
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Pages
400
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ISBN
9780199881369
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Language
English
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Genres
Music / Instruction & Study / General
Music / Instruction & Study / Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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This book "Becoming a One Person Band" gives advice and tips on how to help a person to go from being a keyboard player (or perhaps other musician) to becoming a one person band of 4 or even as many as 16 instruments.  This approach does require a home recording studio and some information is provided in this book on possible approaches.  However, there are of course many ways to do a home recording studio, and so this book concentrates more on technique and how perhaps to determine what notes or chords to play.


What do you need?  A recording studio of course.  But also a desire to become your own one person band as a hobby or even more than a hobby.  And while a musician who only plays guitar or non keyboards may go a distance into becoming your own band, keyboard background would be even more helpful.  What kind of keyboard background would a person need?  If a person has experience with piano, organ or accordion or simply a modern day keyboard or keyboard controller and has one already, that would be a great start.  Why the emphasis on keyboards?  Modern day midi systems or DAW (Digital Audio Workstations) often take their inputs from keyboards and with that can create many sounds and also sound effects.  Yes, much can be done with guitars and perhaps just writing notes in for other parts, but keyboard experience is a great help.


What talent is needed?  It would be hard for me to define that.  I never felt that I was anything special and yet I have accomplished a number of one person band songs with as many as 15 parts, and also enjoyed doing it.  Of course if you have something of a music and band background and also some music theory background it is of course a big help.  I do wish you the very best in your music endeavor, and hope that this book is at least a little helpful to you and your dreams or hobby.

Ron Plachno (author)

Music, Meaning and Transformation: meaningful music making for life, examines the musical experiences that students find meaningful and the ways in which teachers, parents and community music leaders might provide access to meaningful music education. This is particularly relevant today because school music often fails to provide sustainable access to music making for life, health and wellbeing beyond school. This book seeks to reframe the focus of music education within a pragmatist philosophy and provide a framework that is culturally and chronologically inclusive.

The approach involves an intensely personal music teachers’ journey that privilege the voices of students and teachers of a music making community and sets these against rigorous long termed qualitative methodologies.

Music education is shifting focus away from music as an object and process towards the meaning experienced by the student personally, socially and culturally. This is an important and fundamental issue for the development of philosophy for pre-service and practicing music teachers and community music project leaders. The focus now needs to be upon the 98% who could have music as a significant expressive force in their lives as a means of facilitating social inclusion, for mental health and well being and to have access to the sense of belonging that community music making can bring as a lifelong activity. The book aims to provide a comprehensive guide to music education that leads to a music education for all for life. This book emphasises the maker in context examining: the student as maker, the teacher as builder and designer and the school as village.

The relationship between music making, education and health and well being has been and is the subject of many research projects and national and international reviews. Seldom though in these studies has there been any attempt to identify the qualities of successful and sustainable interactions with music making, the qualities of good teaching and good teaching practice. The focus of this book is to provide simple but effective tools for evaluating and testing the meaning evident in a music-making context, identify the modes of engagement and establish the unique expressive music making needs of twenty first century communities.

For further information see http://savetodisc.net

My first encounter with the theory of harmony was during my last year at school (1975). This fascinating system of rules crystallized the intuitive knowledge of harmony I had acquired from years of piano playing, and facilitated memorization, transcription, arrangement and composition. For the next five years, I studied music (piano) and science (Physics) at the Univer sity of Melbourne. This "strange combination" started me wondering about the origins of those music theory "rules". To what extent were they determined or influenced by physics? mathematics? physiology? conditioning? In 1981, the supervisor of my honours project in musical acoustics, Neville Fletcher, showed me an article entitled "Pitch, consonance, and harmony", by a certain Ernst Terhardt of the Technical University of Munich. By that stage, I had devoured a considerable amount of (largely unsatisfactory) material on the nature and origins of harmony, which enabled me to recognize the significance of Terhardt's article. But it was not until I arrived in Munich the following year (on Terhardt's invitation) that I began to appreciate the conse quences of his "psychoacoustical" approach for the theory of harmony. That is what this book is about. The book presents Terhardt's work against the broad context of music perception research, past and present. Music perception is a multidisciplinary mixture of physics, psychology and music. Where different theoretical ap proaches appear contradictory, I try to show instead that they complement and enrich one another.
Get more out of music with this essential guide

Music Theory For Dummies makes music theory easy to understand, with a friendly, unintimidating overview of everything you need to know to become fluent at knocking out beats, reading musical scores, and learning to anticipate where a song should go—whether you're reading someone else's music or writing your own. Whether you're a music student or a music lover, you'll learn to read, write, and understand music with this informative guide. With expert instruction, you'll put it all together as you compose, arrange, and create original melodies, harmonies, and chords of your own, with helpful tips for performing your pieces in front of an audience. This new third edition presents the most current teaching techniques, the newest music genres and examples, and updated information on all aspects of understanding, creating, and performing music.

Studies have shown that music training improves children's' verbal and spatial abilities, and it's been associated with cognitive and mathematical benefits in adults. The music job market is expected to increase over the coming years, and music theory is becoming an increasingly common part of education at all levels. Music Theory For Dummies provides the instruction you need to get more out of music than you ever thought possible.

Master major and minor scales, intervals, pitches, and clefs Understand basic notation, time signals, tempo, dynamics, and navigation Employ melodies, chords, progressions, and phrases to form music Compose harmonies and accompanying melodies for voice and instruments

Whether you intend to pursue a degree or career in music, or just enjoy listening to it, understanding the theory behind it gives you a whole new appreciation for the artistry and craftsmanship behind the pieces that give you goose bumps. It's a mix of technical skill, inborn talent, and plenty of practice – and now you can try your hand at it, with Music Theory For Dummies.

Vocal, Instrumental, and Ensemble Learning and Teaching is one of five paperback books derived from the foundational two-volume Oxford Handbook of Music Education. Designed for music teachers, students, and scholars of music education, as well as educational administrators and policy makers, this third volume in the set emphasizes the types of active musical attributes that are acquired when learning an instrument or to sing, together with how these skills can be used when engaging musically with others. These chapters shed light on how the field of voice instruction has changed dramatically in recent decades and how physiological, acoustical, biomechanical, neuromuscular, and psychological evidence is helping musicians and educators question traditional practices. The authors discuss research on instrumental learning, demonstrating that there is no 'ideal' way to learn, but rather that a chosen learning approach must be appropriate for the context and desired aims. This volume rounds out with a focus on a wide range of perspectives dealing with group performance of instrumental music, an area that is organized and taught in many varied ways internationally. Contributors Alfredo Bautista, Robert Burke, James L. Byo, Jean Callaghan, Don D. Coffman, Andrea Creech, Jane W. Davidson, Steven M. Demorest, Robert A. Duke, Robert Edwin, Shirlee Emmons, Sam Evans, Helena Gaunt, Susan Hallam, Lee Higgins, Jere T. Humphreys, Harald Jers, Harald Jørgensen, Margaret Kartomi, Reinhard Kopiez , William R. Lee, Andreas C. Lehmann, Gary E. McPherson, Steven J. Morrison, John Nix, Ioulia Papageorgi, Kenneth H. Phillips, Lisa Popeil, John W. Richmond, Carlos Xavier Rodriguez, Nelson Roy, Robert T. Sataloff, Frederick A. Seddon, Sten Ternström, Michael Webb, Graham F. Welch, Jenevora Williams, Michael D. Worthy
Do you love sitting at home playing guitar, but find yourself playing the same old things over and over without making much progress?

When other musicians invite you to jam, do you worry that you won’t be able to keep up?

Are you a veteran guitarist who has played for years, but you’re embarrassed to admit you have no idea what you’re doing?

If you want to take your guitar playing to the next level, compose songs like you hear on the radio, and improvise your own music, then you need Fretboard Theory.

Fretboard Theory by Desi Serna teaches music theory for guitar including scales, chords, progressions, modes and more. The hands-on approach to theory shows you how music "works" on the guitar fretboard by visualizing shapes and patterns and how they connect to make music.

Content includes:

* Learn pentatonic and major scale patterns as used to play melodies, riffs, solos, and bass lines


* Move beyond basic chords and common barre chords by playing the types of chord inversions and chord voicings used by music's most famous players


* Chart guitar chord progressions and play by numbers like the pros
* Identify correct scales to play over chords and progressions so you can improvise at will


* Create new sounds with music modes and get to know Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian


* Add variety to your playing by using intervals such as thirds, fourths, and sixths


* Increase your chord vocabulary by using added chord tones and extensions to play chord types such as major 7, minor 7, sus2, sus4, add9, and more


* Learn how all the different aspects of music fit together to make a great song


* See how theory relates to popular styles of music and familiar songs

Fretboard Theory will have you mastering music like a pro easier and faster than you ever thought possible. Plus, it's the ONLY GUITAR THEORY RESOURCE in the world that includes important details to hundreds of popular songs. You learn how to play in the style of pop, rock, acoustic, blues, and more!

This guitar instruction is perfect whether you want to jam, compose or just understand the music you play better. The material is suitable for both acoustic and electric guitar, plus it features many references to bass.

Level: Recommended for intermediate level players on up.

Video

Fretboard Theory is also available as a 21-hour video series that is sold separately on the author's GuitarMusicTheory.com website. Visit the website and sign up for email lessons to sample the footage.

Fretboard Theory Volume II

When you're ready to take your playing to the next level, get the second book in the series, Fretboard Theory Volume II, which is also available as a 12-hour video series.


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