The Hidden Half of the Family: A Sourcebook for Women's Genealogy

Genealogical Publishing Com
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"By law and by custom women's individual identities have been subsumed by those of their husbands. For centuries women were not allowed to own real estate in their own name, sign a deed, devise a will, or enter into contracts, and even their citizenship and their position as head of household have been in doubt. Finding women in traditional genealogical record sources, therefore, presents the researcher with a unique challenge, for census records, wills, land records, pension records--the conventional sources of genealogical identification--all have to be viewed in a different perspective if we are to establish the genealogical identity of our female ancestors. Whether listed under their maiden names, married names, patronymic/matronymic surnames or some other permutation, or hidden under such terms as "Mrs.," "Mistress," "goodwife," "wife of," or even "daughter of," it is clear that women are hard to find.
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Publisher
Genealogical Publishing Com
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Published on
Dec 31, 1999
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Pages
298
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ISBN
9780806315829
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Language
English
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Genres
Reference / Genealogy & Heraldry
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Until the publication of this remarkable new work, no single source could be used to identify & locate the records of the various countries of the Western Hemisphere. Given the extent & diversity of the records, this is hardly surprising; & yet the creation of such a source is precisely the task Christina Schaefer set herself. The immense body of records of the colonial period in the Western Hemisphere presents a serious challenge to the researcher-in some cases even a stumbling block-& therefore in this work Ms. Schaefer has undertaken a systematic examination of the records to show the researcher where to find the most important genealogical records of the period & how to access them, all within the framework of a single encyclopedic volume. Equally important, she has defined the various classes of records in each country, identified as many of them as is practicable in a book of this size, provided historical background & brief sketches of the records themselves, added a description of the principal holdings of the major repositories of each country, & has interwoven selected reading lists throughout. The reader will appreciate, of course, that the subject matter is vast, covering the colonial records of all the Americas, from Latin America to the Caribbean, from the original Thirteen Colonies to Canada & New France, so of necessity the author has been at pains to be as comprehensive as possible. In the end, she has put together a magnificent reference work, one that will guide all researchers, beginners & professionals alike, to the most direct & reliable route to the colonial records of the Western Hemisphere. The scope of the work covers the period of colonial history from the beginning of European colonization in the Western Hemisphere up to the time of the American Revolution, & the records described are the primary records used in genealogical research. However, the time line has been extended to provide more complete information in the following instances: * U.S. states other than the Thirteen Colonies with records that begin prior to the Revolutionary War, until such time as they became part of the U.S. (possession, territory, state) * Latin American countries, which did not declare their independence from Spain & Portugal until 1808 & later * Canada through about 1841 * Caribbean countries & dependencies to about 1810 * The subject of slavery up to the abolition of the slave trade While the best sources of information regarding an immigrant ancestor can usually be found in the country to which he immigrated, there are, nevertheless, many important records still to be found in the country of origin-records which had either remained in the mother country or had been returned to the mother country: church records, for example, emigration & trade company records, indenture agreements, military records, missionary society records, probate records & wills, provincial land grants, & tax records. Thus the last section of this book provides information regarding the location of colonial records in such countries as Denmark, England, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, & Switzerland, & at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The range of the book is so remarkable that even the most seasoned researcher will find it breathtaking. What follows is a listing of the contents of the seven distinct parts that make up the whole. From this itemization the reader can draw his own conclusions about the value of the work as an indispensable desk reference.
This is a definitive account of the land and the people of Old Monocacy in early Frederick County, Maryland. The outgrowth of a project begun by Grace L. Tracey and completed by John P. Dern, it presents a detailed account of landholdings in that part of western Maryland that eventually became Frederick County. At the same time it provides a history of the inhabitants of the area, from the early traders and explorers to the farsighted investors and speculators, from the original Quaker settlers to the Germans of central Frederick County.
In essence, the book has a dual focus. First it attempts to locate and describe the land of the early settlers. This is done by means of a superb series of plat maps, drawn to scale from original surveys and based both on certificates of survey and patents. These show, in precise configurations, the exact locations of the various grants and lots, the names of owners and occupiers, the dates of surveys and patents, and the names of contiguous land owners. Second, it identifies the early settlers and inhabitants of the area, carefully following them through deeds, wills, and inventories, judgment records, and rent rolls.
Finally, in meticulously compiled appendices it provides a chronological list of surveys between 1721 and 1743; an alphabetical list of surveys, giving dates, page reference--text and maps--and patent references; a list of taxables for 1733-34; and a list of the early German settlers of Frederick County, showing their religion, their location, dates of arrival, and their earliest records in the county.
Winner of the 1988 Donald Lines Jacobus Award!
Until the publication of this remarkable new work, no single source could be used to identify & locate the records of the various countries of the Western Hemisphere. Given the extent & diversity of the records, this is hardly surprising; & yet the creation of such a source is precisely the task Christina Schaefer set herself. The immense body of records of the colonial period in the Western Hemisphere presents a serious challenge to the researcher-in some cases even a stumbling block-& therefore in this work Ms. Schaefer has undertaken a systematic examination of the records to show the researcher where to find the most important genealogical records of the period & how to access them, all within the framework of a single encyclopedic volume. Equally important, she has defined the various classes of records in each country, identified as many of them as is practicable in a book of this size, provided historical background & brief sketches of the records themselves, added a description of the principal holdings of the major repositories of each country, & has interwoven selected reading lists throughout. The reader will appreciate, of course, that the subject matter is vast, covering the colonial records of all the Americas, from Latin America to the Caribbean, from the original Thirteen Colonies to Canada & New France, so of necessity the author has been at pains to be as comprehensive as possible. In the end, she has put together a magnificent reference work, one that will guide all researchers, beginners & professionals alike, to the most direct & reliable route to the colonial records of the Western Hemisphere. The scope of the work covers the period of colonial history from the beginning of European colonization in the Western Hemisphere up to the time of the American Revolution, & the records described are the primary records used in genealogical research. However, the time line has been extended to provide more complete information in the following instances: * U.S. states other than the Thirteen Colonies with records that begin prior to the Revolutionary War, until such time as they became part of the U.S. (possession, territory, state) * Latin American countries, which did not declare their independence from Spain & Portugal until 1808 & later * Canada through about 1841 * Caribbean countries & dependencies to about 1810 * The subject of slavery up to the abolition of the slave trade While the best sources of information regarding an immigrant ancestor can usually be found in the country to which he immigrated, there are, nevertheless, many important records still to be found in the country of origin-records which had either remained in the mother country or had been returned to the mother country: church records, for example, emigration & trade company records, indenture agreements, military records, missionary society records, probate records & wills, provincial land grants, & tax records. Thus the last section of this book provides information regarding the location of colonial records in such countries as Denmark, England, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, & Switzerland, & at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The range of the book is so remarkable that even the most seasoned researcher will find it breathtaking. What follows is a listing of the contents of the seven distinct parts that make up the whole. From this itemization the reader can draw his own conclusions about the value of the work as an indispensable desk reference.
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