Facing the Past: Looking Back at Refugee Childhood in New Zealand 1940s–1960s

Bridget Williams Books
Free sample

In her first book, A Small Price to Pay, Ann Beaglehole traced the experiences of European refugees to New Zealand in the 1930s. In Facing the Past she focuses on the lives of a younger generation – the children of those wartime immigrants, whose perceptions and experiences of both the old and the new world were very different from their parents'.

At school, in the neighbourhood, or on the sportsfield, many of them were painfully aware of being 'outsiders' in a society unused to cultural diversity. Yet their need to belong was frequently complicated by loyalty to the very different ideals and expectations of their parents. As one of them comments I was getting two messages... the 'always remember,' message and the 'start from now' message. Based on a wide range of interviews as well as documentary evidence from second-generation refugees worldwide, this is a fascinating account of the lives of immigrant children growing up in the decades between the 1940s and 1960s.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Ann Beaglehole is an historian and novelist who came to New Zealand during the 1956 uprising in Hungary. She has worked as an historian, policy analyst, researcher, counsellor, and a lecturer. She has worked for Te Puni Kōkiri, Ministry of Māori Development as a Senior Policy Analyst, and for the Office of Ethnic Affairs. Currently she is doing research for Waitangi Tribunal inquiries.


She has received numerous awards including the Ledig House International Writers Residency, New York, 2006; Goethe-Institute Scholarship as Cultural Ambassador in Berlin, 2001; the Department of Internal Affairs, Award in Oral History International Research Institute on Jewish Women at Brandies University, 2000; New Zealand Founders’ Society Annual Research Award for historical research, 1998; New Zealand History Research Trust Fund Award in History, 1993; the Claude McCarthy Fellow, Victoria University of Wellington, and the F.P. Wilson Prize for New Zealand History, 1986.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 16, 2015
Read more
Collapse
Pages
220
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781927131503
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural Heritage
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Combining history and hardship, battles and betrayal, miraculous escapes and death-defying encounters, From Exile to Eden chronicles one family’s journey from deportation in Siberia to safety and freedom in America.

On February 10, 1940, the Szelazek family was deported as prisoners of war from Poland to a Soviet labor camp in Siberia, beginning a 12-year epic journey that spanned countries and continents.

In From Exile to Eden, Jadwiga Szelazek Morrison traces her family’s harrowing yet inspirational flight from war-torn Europe beginning with two remarkable people—Tadeusz Szelazek born in 1909 to a titled family of the old Polish aristocracy and Helena Semerylo born on Armistice Day 1918.

Tadeusz and Helena create an unforgettable story of love, loyalty, courage, and inspiration. Helena, destined to be unusual from the moment of her birth, discovers her psychic awakening at the age of five when she is struck by lightning, followed by a second lightning strike as a teenager. Her abilities prove to be both a blessing and a curse for her and her family, and lead her on a journey to distant lands far from the land of her birth. Tadeusz follows a path of intellectual pursuits trying to unravel the meaning of life, in the end finding answers only within himself and from those he loves. A chance encounter with a world-renowned seer, leaves him in possession of predictions concerning his future. With logic and intellect battling the possibilities of predestination, he finds his life unfolding in patterns which he fights to control and change.

Drawn from memoirs and family journals, From Exile to Eden weaves history, adventure, romance, parapsychology, and inspiration; sharing the story of the Szelazeks’ exile as political war prisoners, their battles with disease, hardship, betrayal, death, and struggles for freedom throughout Russia, Europe, and the Middle East. The many miraculous escapes, death-defying encounters on the battle field, personal encounters with famous political figures, and numerous paranormal incidents will keep readers on the edge of their seats.

NOW AN ORIGINAL SERIES ON ABC • “Just may be the best new comedy of [the year] . . . based on restaurateur Eddie Huang’s memoir of the same name . . . [a] classic fresh-out-of-water comedy.”—People
 
“Bawdy and frequently hilarious . . . a surprisingly sophisticated memoir about race and assimilation in America . . . as much James Baldwin and Jay-Z as Amy Tan . . . rowdy [and] vital . . . It’s a book about fitting in by not fitting in at all.”—Dwight Garner, The New York Times
 
NATIONAL BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY KIRKUS REVIEWS
 
Assimilating ain’t easy. Eddie Huang was raised by a wild family of FOB (“fresh off the boat”) immigrants—his father a cocksure restaurateur with a dark past back in Taiwan, his mother a fierce protector and constant threat. Young Eddie tried his hand at everything mainstream America threw his way, from white Jesus to macaroni and cheese, but finally found his home as leader of a rainbow coalition of lost boys up to no good: skate punks, dealers, hip-hop junkies, and sneaker freaks. This is the story of a Chinese-American kid in a could-be-anywhere cul-de-sac blazing his way through America’s deviant subcultures, trying to find himself, ten thousand miles from his legacy and anchored only by his conflicted love for his family and his passion for food. Funny, moving, and stylistically inventive, Fresh Off the Boat is more than a radical reimagining of the immigrant memoir—it’s the exhilarating story of every American outsider who finds his destiny in the margins.
 
Praise for Fresh Off the Boat
 
“Brash and funny . . . outrageous, courageous, moving, ironic and true.”—New York Times Book Review
 
“Mercilessly funny and provocative, Fresh Off the Boat is also a serious piece of work. Eddie Huang is hunting nothing less than Big Game here. He does everything with style.”—Anthony Bourdain
 
“Uproariously funny . . . emotionally honest.”—Chicago Tribune
 
“Huang is a fearless raconteur. [His] writing is at once hilarious and provocative; his incisive wit pulls through like a perfect plate of dan dan noodles.”—Interview
 
“Although writing a memoir is an audacious act for a thirty-year-old, it is not nearly as audacious as some of the things Huang did and survived even earlier. . . . Whatever he ends up doing, you can be sure it won’t look or sound like anything that’s come before. A single, kinetic passage from Fresh Off the Boat . . . is all you need to get that straight.”—Bookforum
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.