History Man: The Life of R. G. Collingwood

Princeton University Press
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This is the first biography of the last and greatest British idealist philosopher, R. G. Collingwood (1889-1943), a man who both thought and lived at full pitch. Best known today for his philosophies of history and art, Collingwood was also a historian, archaeologist, sailor, artist, and musician. A figure of enormous energy and ambition, he took as his subject nothing less than the whole of human endeavor, and he lived in the same way, seeking to experience the complete range of human passion. In this vivid and swiftly paced narrative, Fred Inglis tells the dramatic story of a remarkable life, from Collingwood's happy Lakeland childhood to his successes at Oxford, his archaeological digs as a renowned authority on Roman Britain, his solo sailing adventures in the English Channel, his long struggle with illness, and his sometimes turbulent romantic life.

In a manner unheard of today, Collingwood attempted to gather all aspects of human thought into a single theory of practical experience, and he wrote sweeping accounts of history, art, science, politics, metaphysics, and archaeology, as well as a highly regarded autobiography. Above all, he dedicated his life to arguing that history--not science--is the only source of moral and political wisdom and self-knowledge.

Linking the intellectual and personal sides of Collingwood's life, and providing a rich history of his milieu, History Man also assesses Collingwood's influence on generations of scholars after his death and the renewed recognition of his importance and interest today.

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About the author

Fred Inglis is the author of more than twenty books, including People's Witness: The Journalist in Modern Politics and The Cruel Peace: Everyday Life and the Cold War (Basic). He is professor emeritus of cultural studies at the University of Sheffield.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Jul 6, 2009
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Pages
400
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ISBN
9781400830510
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Biography & Autobiography / Social Scientists & Psychologists
History / General
History / Historiography
History / Study & Teaching
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Richard Hoggart has been, perhaps, the best-known, and certainly the most affectionately acknowledged, British intellectual of the past sixty years. His great classic, The Uses of Literacy, provided for thousands of unsung working-class readers a wholly recognisable and tender account of their own coming-to-maturity and of the preciousness and the hardships of the life of the poor in pre-World War II Britain.

But he was far more than narrator of a neglected class. Hoggart was also a public figure of extraordinary energy and eminence. He dominated the single most important Royal Commission on broadcasting, and single-handedly he is remembered as clinching for the defence the publication of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, after which he became a leading officer and defender of the international agency protecting the culture of the very world, UNESCO.

This is the first biography of this amazing man. It seeks to tie together in a single narrative life and work, to settle Hoggart in the great happiness of a fulfilled family life and in the astonishing achievements of his public and professional career, considering each of his books in detail, and following him through the long and hard labours of his different public and academic offices.

Fred Inglis tells this gripping tale of a figure of great significance to anyone who cherishes the stuff of culture, and tells it vividly and directly. It is a tale of a good man with which to edify the present, and to teach us of all that now threatens our best national (and international) forms of expression: our art, our culture, ourselves.
A New York Times Bestseller

Foreword by Stephen J. Dubner, coauthor of Freakonomics

When first-year graduate student Sudhir Venkatesh walked into an abandoned building in one of Chicago’s most notorious housing projects, he hoped to find a few people willing to take a multiple-choice survey on urban poverty--and impress his professors with his boldness. He never imagined that as a result of this assignment he would befriend a gang leader named JT and spend the better part of a decade embedded inside the projects under JT’s protection. From a privileged position of unprecedented access, Venkatesh observed JT and the rest of his gang as they operated their crack-selling business, made peace with their neighbors, evaded the law, and rose up or fell within the ranks of the gang’s complex hierarchical structure. Examining the morally ambiguous, highly intricate, and often corrupt struggle to survive in an urban war zone, Gang Leader for a Day also tells the story of the complicated friendship that develops between Venkatesh and JT--two young and ambitious men a universe apart.

"Riveting."--The New York Times

"Compelling... dramatic... Venkatesh gives readers a window into a way of life that few Americans understand."--Newsweek

"An eye-opening account into an underserved city within the city."--Chicago Tribune

"The achievement of Gang Leader for a Day is to give the dry statistics a raw, beating heart."--The Boston Globe

"A rich portrait of the urban poor, drawn not from statistics but from viivd tales of their lives and his, and how they intertwined."--The Economist

"A sensative, sympathetic, unpatronizing portrayal of lives that are ususally ignored or lumped into ill-defined stereotype."--Finanical Times

Sudhir Venkatesh’s latest book Floating City: A Rogue Sociologist Lost and Found in New York’s Underground Economy--a memoir of sociological investigation revealing the true face of America’s most diverse city--was published in September 2013 by Penguin Press


 

 




From the Trade Paperback edition.
[The SAGE Key Concepts series provides students with accessible and authoritative knowledge of the essential topics in a variety of disciplines. Cross-referenced throughout, the format encourages critical evaluation through understanding. Written by experienced and respected academics, the books are indispensable study aids and guides to comprehension.]

'Dipping into this short collection reveals an eminently useful resource aimed at providing not just a use-friendly lexicon but also an example of a degree of criticality for those new to the area of education....the authors manage to tackle some serious issues with conviction, clarity and concision, all the while maintaining a sense of humour where comparable examples merely seem pedantic' - ESCalate

'This is an essential resource for anyone serious about using the English Language to talk about teaching and learning....Inglis and Aers provide a resource for [a common professional language] in their compact and highly accessible book. It has a sound philosophical rationale in which 102 key concepts in education are presented alphabetically and cross-referenced (the book reads like a high quality hyperlinked web-page)' - www.thinkingclassroom.co.uk

'This is an engaging and accessible resource which explains various sociological, philosophical and psychological concepts relevant to contemporary educational practice. The concepts are succinctly and sometimes provocatively defined and related to today's pressing issues. It will be a particularly useful reference tool for students and practitioners of education alike, with each entry including references for further reading' - Geoff Whitty, Director, Institute of Education, University of London

'If you are seeking a clear guide to principles which should guide public life in general and education in particular, look no further. Inglis and Aers write with enviable and compelling clarity. Something for all in education especially practitioners and policy makers to read and return to' - Tim Brighouse, recently Chief Adviser for London Schools and formerly Chief Education Officer for Birmingham

This text provides students with over 100 essential themes, topics and expressions that Education students are likely to encounter, both during their courses and beyond in professional practice.

Co-authored to draw on experiences of working within academia, local authorities and the classroom, the entries provide:

- a definition of the concept

- a description of the historical and practical context

- an explanation of how the concept is applied

- an evaluation of the concept

- helpful references and suggested further reading

This book will be essential reading for students of Education, and an invaluable reference tool for their professional careers.

Fred Inglis is Emeritus Professor of Cultural Studies, University of Sheffield.

Lesley Aers is a senior member of a local authority school improvement service and an Ofsted inspector.

Both authors are former schoolteachers.

[The SAGE Key Concepts series provides students with accessible and authoritative knowledge of the essential topics in a variety of disciplines. Cross-referenced throughout, the format encourages critical evaluation through understanding. Written by experienced and respected academics, the books are indispensable study aids and guides to comprehension.]

'Dipping into this short collection reveals an eminently useful resource aimed at providing not just a use-friendly lexicon but also an example of a degree of criticality for those new to the area of education....the authors manage to tackle some serious issues with conviction, clarity and concision, all the while maintaining a sense of humour where comparable examples merely seem pedantic' - ESCalate

'This is an essential resource for anyone serious about using the English Language to talk about teaching and learning....Inglis and Aers provide a resource for [a common professional language] in their compact and highly accessible book. It has a sound philosophical rationale in which 102 key concepts in education are presented alphabetically and cross-referenced (the book reads like a high quality hyperlinked web-page)' - www.thinkingclassroom.co.uk

'This is an engaging and accessible resource which explains various sociological, philosophical and psychological concepts relevant to contemporary educational practice. The concepts are succinctly and sometimes provocatively defined and related to today's pressing issues. It will be a particularly useful reference tool for students and practitioners of education alike, with each entry including references for further reading' - Geoff Whitty, Director, Institute of Education, University of London

'If you are seeking a clear guide to principles which should guide public life in general and education in particular, look no further. Inglis and Aers write with enviable and compelling clarity. Something for all in education especially practitioners and policy makers to read and return to' - Tim Brighouse, recently Chief Adviser for London Schools and formerly Chief Education Officer for Birmingham

This text provides students with over 100 essential themes, topics and expressions that Education students are likely to encounter, both during their courses and beyond in professional practice.

Co-authored to draw on experiences of working within academia, local authorities and the classroom, the entries provide:

- a definition of the concept

- a description of the historical and practical context

- an explanation of how the concept is applied

- an evaluation of the concept

- helpful references and suggested further reading

This book will be essential reading for students of Education, and an invaluable reference tool for their professional careers.

Fred Inglis is Emeritus Professor of Cultural Studies, University of Sheffield.

Lesley Aers is a senior member of a local authority school improvement service and an Ofsted inspector.

Both authors are former schoolteachers.

Love it or hate it, celebrity is one of the dominant features of modern life--and one of the least understood. Fred Inglis sets out to correct this problem in this entertaining and enlightening social history of modern celebrity, from eighteenth-century London to today's Hollywood. Vividly written and brimming with fascinating stories of figures whose lives mark important moments in the history of celebrity, this book explains how fame has changed over the past two-and-a-half centuries.

Starting with the first modern celebrities in mid-eighteenth-century London, including Samuel Johnson and the Prince Regent, the book traces the changing nature of celebrity and celebrities through the age of the Romantic hero, the European fin de siècle, and the Gilded Age in New York and Chicago. In the twentieth century, the book covers the Jazz Age, the rise of political celebrities such as Mussolini, Hitler, and Stalin, and the democratization of celebrity in the postwar decades, as actors, rock stars, and sports heroes became the leading celebrities.

Arguing that celebrity is a mirror reflecting some of the worst as well as some of the best aspects of modern history itself, Inglis considers how the lives of the rich and famous provide not only entertainment but also social cohesion and, like morality plays, examples of what--and what not--to do.

This book will interest anyone who is curious about the history that lies behind one of the great preoccupations of our lives.

Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Richard Hoggart has been, perhaps, the best-known, and certainly the most affectionately acknowledged, British intellectual of the past sixty years. His great classic, The Uses of Literacy, provided for thousands of unsung working-class readers a wholly recognisable and tender account of their own coming-to-maturity and of the preciousness and the hardships of the life of the poor in pre-World War II Britain.

But he was far more than narrator of a neglected class. Hoggart was also a public figure of extraordinary energy and eminence. He dominated the single most important Royal Commission on broadcasting, and single-handedly he is remembered as clinching for the defence the publication of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, after which he became a leading officer and defender of the international agency protecting the culture of the very world, UNESCO.

This is the first biography of this amazing man. It seeks to tie together in a single narrative life and work, to settle Hoggart in the great happiness of a fulfilled family life and in the astonishing achievements of his public and professional career, considering each of his books in detail, and following him through the long and hard labours of his different public and academic offices.

Fred Inglis tells this gripping tale of a figure of great significance to anyone who cherishes the stuff of culture, and tells it vividly and directly. It is a tale of a good man with which to edify the present, and to teach us of all that now threatens our best national (and international) forms of expression: our art, our culture, ourselves.
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