This and that Genealogy Tips

Genealogical Publishing Com
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This classic work on colonial Southern families contains hundreds of genealogies giving names; dates of birth, marriage, and death; names of children and their offspring, with dates and places of birth, marriage and death; names of collateral connections; places of residence; biographical highlights; and war records. Over 12,000 individuals are referred to in the text, all of them easily located in the alphabetical index.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Genealogical Publishing Com
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Published on
Dec 31, 2000
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Pages
249
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ISBN
9780806350271
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
Reference / Genealogy & Heraldry
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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"Between 1650 and 1775 many thousands of Scots were banished to the American colonies for political, religious, or criminal offenses. In the aftermath of the English Civil War, for example, Oliver Cromwell transported thousands of Scots soldiers to Virginia, New England, and the West Indies. The Covenanter Risings of the later 17th century led to around 1,700 Scots being expelled as enemies of the state, and the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 resulted in an additional 1,600 men, women, and children being banished to the colonies. Moreover, from the 1650s to 1830, when it became illegal, banishment and transportation to the colonies was a traditional punishment for certain serious?but over time petty?crimes, thereby contributing even further to the Scottish population of colonial America. In the more than twenty-five years since Dr. David Dobson first endeavored to account for the individual Scots who took part in this forced emigration (1984)--the ancestors of thousands of Americans living today--he has established himself as the undisputed authority on Scottish emigration to the New World. In the absence of official Scottish passenger lists for the period, he initially derived his information from the records of the Privy Council of Scotland, the High Court of Justiciary, Treasury and State Pagers, and prison records, the sources of the majority of extant information available on the Scots who were banished to the colonies prior to 1775. His initial success, however, did not stop him over the intervening years from hunting in ever more obscure sources in North America and the UK--sources such as the Aberdeen Journal, Caledonian Mercury, the Dumfries and Galloway Archives, Justiciary Records of Argyll, Calendar of Home Office Papers, and more. Dr. Dobson?s tireless efforts have produced this new second edition of the Directory of Scots Banished to the American Plantations, 1650-1775, containing fully 30% more convict passengers than in the original. For each person cited in this directory, some or all of the following information is provided: name, occupation, place of residence in Scotland, place of capture and captivity, parents? names, date and cause of banishment, name of the ship carrying him or her to the colonies, and date and place of arrival in the colonies. The exact number of Scots banished to the Americas may never be known because records are not comprehensive; moreover, some Scottish felons sentenced in England were shipped from English ports. The contemporary English judicial system was harsher than in Scotland, which explains why the Hanoverian government had the Jacobite prisoners taken south to England for trial. The first edition of this work has been enlarged by the addition of fresh material, particularly from American sources but also from more obscure sources in Scotland. Dr. Dobson has made some modifications as well; for example, some men who were thought to have been Covenanters are now classed as rebels and English transportees have been omitted, while the references used have been enhanced to facilitate further research. In total, somewhere between 4,000 and 5,000 Scots were banished to the Americas during the Colonial period (whereas England transported around 50,000 and Ireland in excess of 10,000), all of whom contributed to the settlement and development of Colonial America."--Genealogical.com.
This is a definitive account of the land and the people of Old Monocacy in early Frederick County, Maryland. The outgrowth of a project begun by Grace L. Tracey and completed by John P. Dern, it presents a detailed account of landholdings in that part of western Maryland that eventually became Frederick County. At the same time it provides a history of the inhabitants of the area, from the early traders and explorers to the farsighted investors and speculators, from the original Quaker settlers to the Germans of central Frederick County.
In essence, the book has a dual focus. First it attempts to locate and describe the land of the early settlers. This is done by means of a superb series of plat maps, drawn to scale from original surveys and based both on certificates of survey and patents. These show, in precise configurations, the exact locations of the various grants and lots, the names of owners and occupiers, the dates of surveys and patents, and the names of contiguous land owners. Second, it identifies the early settlers and inhabitants of the area, carefully following them through deeds, wills, and inventories, judgment records, and rent rolls.
Finally, in meticulously compiled appendices it provides a chronological list of surveys between 1721 and 1743; an alphabetical list of surveys, giving dates, page reference--text and maps--and patent references; a list of taxables for 1733-34; and a list of the early German settlers of Frederick County, showing their religion, their location, dates of arrival, and their earliest records in the county.
Winner of the 1988 Donald Lines Jacobus Award!
This book began as Jean Stephenson's effort to validate the family tradition that her great-great-grandparents emigrated from Belfast to South Carolina under the leadership of Covenanter Presbyterian minister William Martin in 1772. The author was not only able to authenticate the crux of the story, but, in the process, to place nearly 500 Scotch-Irish families in South Carolina on the eve of the Revolutionary War. The impetus for the colonization was the combination of exorbitant land rents in Northern Ireland, sometimes provoking violent resistance, and the offer of free land and inexpensive tools and provisions tendered by the colonial government of South Carolina. For instance, each Scottish Covenanter was entitled to 100 acres for himself and 50 acres for his spouse, and an additional 50 acres for each child brought to South Carolina. Faced with this crisis and opportunity, Reverend Martin persuaded his parishioners that they had nothing to lose by leaving Ulster, and before long he was in charge of a small fleet of vessels bound for South Carolina. This story is recounted by Ms. Stephenson from the records of the South Carolina Council Journal and tax lists, passenger lists, church histories, and other sources housed at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Genealogists will want to pore over the land evidences assembled by the author from entries found in the Council Journal, namely, authorizations, survey abstracts, wills, deeds and other records which demonstrate where each family settled, or was entitled to settle. The families, which are grouped under the vessel they traveled in, are identified by the name of the household head, names of spouse and children, number of acres surveyed, county, location of the nearest body of water and the names of abutting neighbor, and the source of the information. For the reader's convenience, there is not only an index of the persons found in the list of survey entries and a separate subject index, but also a table of spelling variants. A work of exacting scholarship, Scotch-Irish Migration to South Carolina, 1772 is a crucial source on settlement of the Palmetto State on the eve of the American Revolution.
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