Problems in Management of Locally Abundant Wild Mammals

Elsevier
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Problems in Management of Locally Abundant Wild Mammals contains the proceedings of the Management of Locally Abundant Wild Mammals: A Workshop to Examine the Need for and Alternatives to the Culling of Wild Animals, held in Yarmouth Port, Massachusetts from September 29 to October 3, 1980. Contributors reexamine the scientific basis for possible management aimed at restraining local increase in numbers of locally abundant wild mammals, with emphasis on the issue of culling.
This text is organized into six sections encompassing 19 chapters and begins with an overview of the dilemma of local overabundance or overpopulation of threatened mammals. In particular, it considers the extent to which past predictions have been fulfilled in practice, and whether understanding of the dynamics of living systems is adequate for useful prediction. This book also discusses the circumstances that allow a species to become so abundant and the adverse effects that arise. The chapters that follow present case studies that reflect experiences around the world concerning management of locally abundant mammals, including the white rhino in South Africa and deer in North America. This book also explores proposed solutions for problems involving the management of polar bear, the Northwest Atlantic humpback whale, and the British grey seal.
This reference material is a valuable resource for zoologists, conservation biologists, and those with interest in the protection of wild mammals.
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Publisher
Elsevier
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Published on
Dec 2, 2012
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Pages
360
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ISBN
9780323138222
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Human exploitation of other mammals has passed through three histori cal phases, distinct in their ecological significance though overlapping in time. Initially, Homo sapiens was a predator, particularly of herbivores but also of fur-bearing predators. From about 11 000 years ago, goats and sheep were domesticated in the Middle East, rapidly replacing gazelles and other game as the principal source of meat. The principal crops, including wheat and barley, were taken into agriculture at about the same time, and the resulting Neolithic farming culture spread slowly from there over the subsequent 10 500 years. In a few places such as Mexico, Peru and China, this Middle Eastern culture met and merged with agricultural traditions that had made a similar but independent transition. These agricultural traditions provided the essential support for the industrial revolution, and for a third phase of industrial exploita tion of mammals. In this chapter, these themes are drawn out and their ecological signifi cance is investigated. Some of the impacts of humans on other mammals require consideration on a world-wide basis, but the chapter concen trates, parochially, on Great Britain. What have been the ecological consequences of our exploitation of other mammals? 2. 2 HISTORICAL PHASES OF EXPLOITATION 2. 2. 1 Predatory man Our nearest relatives - chimpanzees, orang utans and gorillas - are essentially forest species, deriving most of their diet from the fruits of forest trees and the shoots and leaves of plants.
Evidence is mounting that top carnivores and other large mammals play a pivotal role in regulating ecosystem health and function, yet those are the species that are most likely to have been eliminated by past human activities. In recent decades, numerous efforts have been undertaken to return some of the species that were previously extirpated on local or regional scales.Large Mammal Restoration brings together for the first time detailed case studies of those efforts, from restoring elk in Appalachia to returning bison herds to the Great Plains to the much-publicized effort to bring back the gray wolf to Yellowstone National Park. Together these case studies offer important lessons and new ways of thinking for wildlife managers and conservation biologists involved with restoration programs. Sections examine: approaches to determining the feasibility of a restoration program critical hands-on aspects of restoring large mammals obtaining public input into the process and gaining community support for programs the potential of some species to return without direct human intervention, and what can be done to facilitate that natural colonization An introductory chapter by Reed F. Noss explores some of the reasons for restoring large mammals, as well as some of the ecological and social complications, and a concluding overview by David S. Maehr discusses the evolutionary importance of large mammal restoration. Contributors include Paul C. Paquet, Barbara Dugelby, Steven H. Fritts, Paul R. Krausman, Larry D. Harris, Johnna Roy, and many others. Large Mammal Restoration brings together in a single volume essential information on the lessons learned from previous efforts, providing an invaluable resource for researchers and students of conservation biology and wildlife management as well as for policymakers, restoration advocates, and others involved with the planning or execution of a restoration program.
Until now, information on mammals in South Asia has never been brought together on a single platform providing all‐inclusive knowledge on the subject. This book is the most up‐to‐date comprehensive resource on the mammalian diversity of South Asia. It offers information on the diversity, distribution and status of 504 species of terrestrial and aquatic mammals found in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. This work is unique being the first of its kind that deals with diversity and distribution at the subspecies level. The book is divided in to three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the subject and takes off from the recent works on mammals at the global level, provides an historical perspective on mammal studies in South Asia and concludes with a note on recent phylogenetic changes at supraordinal levels. Chapter 2 summarizes the information on the diversity of South Asian Mammals, provides analysis by country of mammalian diversity (supported by data in tabular form) dealing with species richness, endemism and possibly occurring species, separate analysis for each country with details on endemic and threatened species, extinct mammals, domestic mammals, and finally the IUCN status of mammals with special emphasis on threatened mammals. Chapter 3 is a comprehensive checklist that provides information on each species, including its scientific name, type details, standardized English name, synonyms, subspecies, distribution and comments on taxonomic status. Country‐wise listings and analysis of species richness with emphasis on subspecies distribution Most of the analysis is supported by data in tabular forms for better understanding Notes on extinct and domesticated mammals as well as their IUCN Red List Status with criteria for such status A very comprehensive bibliography that would help readers track down specific literature ​
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