A Kansan Conquers the Cosmos: Or, “Spaced out All My Life!”

iUniverse
Free sample

A Kansan Conquers the Cosmos presents the story of Alan Glines, who began working with NASA in 1966 and was part of Mission Control during the height of the space program. Full of fun and excitement, Gliness autobiography offers a first-person glimpse into four decades of the field of aerospace.

He traces his own history from the beginning of his career through to the present and shares interesting anecdotes and histories of NASA and the American space program. From his days a science fictionobsessed youth who ran a theater as if it were mission control to his various experiences in NASA, Glines attained the Mission Control spirit and dedication that he has lived for decadesthat is, being on the playing field and being all you can be, all the time. Over four decades, he has acquired an extraordinarily rich tapestry of experience in the aerospace worlds of research and development, and command and control, exploring no fewer than seven geographical and intellectual career paths over the years.

As a man whose career, teaching, and speaking efforts continue to inspire others today, Gliness story is a detailed and unique and the aerospace industry in America from the inside.

Read more
Collapse

About the author

Alan Glines grew up in Kansas in the fifties and sixties. After receiving a bachelor of science in electrical engineering from Kansas University and a master of science in systems management from USC, he began work at NASA-Johnson Space center, where he was part of both the Gemini and Apollo programs. He still works in the aerospace industry today.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
iUniverse
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Nov 22, 2010
Read more
Collapse
Pages
108
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781450264426
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Science & Technology
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
In the heady days of the early 1960s, the United States found itself perched on the edge of technological, sociological, and societal precipices. Advances made by its enemies with offensive ballistic-missile systems put America in catch-up mode, both on Earth and in orbit. Others were leading the race to space, and that was an affront to American safety, status, and national pride.

For the men and women employed as top-secret research workers at the General Motors Division, secrecy was a way of life. The projects they worked onincluding Project Jennifer, Big Bird, Thor, Titan missiles, Matador, Regulus, the stealth fighter, and the Fastest Gun in the Westwere cloaked in the highest security possible. In their labs, the Lunar Rover, Apollo Guidance, and the complex, multinational F-16 systems were born.

Don Peeler was a typical engineer in this high-stress environment, but his personal experiences were atypical. During his years at the General Motors Division, he experienced events that ran from the humorous to the heroic, and in Nothing Was Ever Normal, he shares his best memories of those days. For Don and his peers, there was no normal or any such thing as standard operating procedures, because what was occurring had never been experienced before. Compared to NASAs Manned Space Program, their glory came from knowing that what they were doing was essential to the security of the United States. Now that their classification designations have lapsed, the stories of the Band of Others can finally be told.

Don Peeler was one of thousands of bright engineers who helped America dominate space during the Cold War and beyond. He endured sleepless nights fueled by coffee and cigarettes to troubleshoot technical problems and meet launch deadlines, because every project was new and nothing was normal meant nothing was typical or predictable. In this book, he looks back on his storied career.

Peelers pride is palpable, whether hes describing an early missile launch at Cape Canaveral or the laborious, hands-on process of solving a new guidance systems glitch. But overall, Peelers memoir covers decades of wide-ranging projects Several Air Force Strategic missiles, Mercury, Apollo, several CIA programs, the F-16 aircraft and ends up with several automotive applications.

The recollections Peeler fleshes out the most occur later in his career, when he has moved up to management and contract negotiation for his employer, a highly regarded division of General Motors. (The astronauts, as depicted in documentaries and film, drove Corvettes: They were gifts from GM, Peeler notes.) His stories of his greatest negotiating successes demonstrate how the author earned the nickname Wheeler Dealer Peeler.

Peeler wrote this memoir to give credit to the men who toiled behind the scenes of the dramatic rocket launches and to tell the younger generation what his peers accomplished. In that, he has succeeded. The book will likely appeal mostly to people who have worked in the industry, but it may also whet readers appetites to read up more on the projects covered, or revisit films such as Apollo 13.

The Book is available in hardcover, paperback and eBook.

Review made by BlueInk,

New York Times Book Review 10 Best Books of 2018

A New York Times Notable Book 

The #1 New York Times bestseller.

A brilliant and brave investigation into the medical and scientific revolution taking place around psychedelic drugs--and the spellbinding story of his own life-changing psychedelic experiences

When Michael Pollan set out to research how LSD and psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) are being used to provide relief to people suffering from difficult-to-treat conditions such as depression, addiction and anxiety, he did not intend to write what is undoubtedly his most personal book. But upon discovering how these remarkable substances are improving the lives not only of the mentally ill but also of healthy people coming to grips with the challenges of everyday life, he decided to explore the landscape of the mind in the first person as well as the third. Thus began a singular adventure into various altered states of consciousness, along with a dive deep into both the latest brain science and the thriving underground community of psychedelic therapists. Pollan sifts the historical record to separate the truth about these mysterious drugs from the myths that have surrounded them since the 1960s, when a handful of psychedelic evangelists inadvertently catalyzed a powerful backlash against what was then a promising field of research.

A unique and elegant blend of science, memoir, travel writing, history, and medicine, How to Change Your Mind is a triumph of participatory journalism. By turns dazzling and edifying, it is the gripping account of a journey to an exciting and unexpected new frontier in our understanding of the mind, the self, and our place in the world. The true subject of Pollan's "mental travelogue" is not just psychedelic drugs but also the eternal puzzle of human consciousness and how, in a world that offers us both suffering and joy, we can do our best to be fully present and find meaning in our lives.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.