The Modern Supernatural and the Beginnings of Cinema

Springer
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This study sees the nineteenth century supernatural as a significant context for cinema’s first years. The book takes up the familiar notion of cinema as a “ghostly,” “spectral” or “haunted” medium and asks what made such association possible. Examining the history of the projected image and supernatural displays, psychical research and telepathy, spirit photography and X-rays, the skeletons of the danse macabre and the ghostly spaces of the mind, it uncovers many lost and fascinating connections. The Modern Supernatural and the Beginnings of Cinema locates film’s spectral affinities within a history stretching back to the beginning of screen practice and forward to the digital era. In addition to examining the use of supernatural themes by pioneering filmmakers like Georges Méliès and George Albert Smith, it also engages with the representations of cinema’s ghostly past in Guy Maddin’s recent online project Seances (2016). It is ideal for those interested in the history of cinema, the study of the supernatural and the pre-history of the horror film.
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About the author

Murray Leeder teaches Film Studies at the University of Calgary, Canada, and holds a PhD from Carleton University. He is the author of Horror Film: A Critical Introduction (forthcoming) and Halloween (2014) and editor of Cinematic Ghosts: Haunting and Spectrality from Silent Cinema to the Digital Era (2015).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Jan 10, 2017
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Pages
209
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ISBN
9781137583710
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Language
English
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Genres
Performing Arts / Acting & Auditioning
Performing Arts / Film / Direction & Production
Performing Arts / Film / General
Performing Arts / Film / Genres / General
Performing Arts / Film / History & Criticism
Performing Arts / General
Performing Arts / Theater / Stagecraft & Scenography
Photography / Techniques / Cinematography & Videography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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