Harvard Law Review: Volume 130, Number 6 - April 2017

Quid Pro Books
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The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, linked URLs in notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 6 include scholarly articles and student casenotes, as well as as the extensive, annual survey of Developments in the Law. This year's subject is The U.S. Territories. Topics include territorial federalism, federal deference to Guam on its law, Puerto Rico's place in the UN and the international community, and citizenship in American Samoa.  

The issue also includes an article by John Rappaport on "How Private Insurers Regulate Public Police." In addition, student contributions explore Recent Cases on the First Amendment and selfies at the ballot box, the amendment's protection for publishing code for 3-D printing of handguns, antitrust law and market definition for hospitals, the Fourth Circuit's rejection of North Carolina election rules based on racial discrimination, statutes of limitation and repose in the context of class actions, subjecting Notre Dame to "company town" analysis in state action law, and delegation of indigent criminal defense to the Missouri governor. 

Finally, the issue includes several summaries of Recent Publications. 

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About the author

Principal articles are written by internationally recognized legal scholars, and student-editors contribute substantial research in the form of Recent Case commentaries and surveys of recent developments in the law. 

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Publisher
Quid Pro Books
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Published on
Apr 10, 2017
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Pages
257
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ISBN
9781610277846
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Criminal Procedure
Law / Government / State, Provincial & Municipal
Law / Jurisprudence
Law / Public
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The contents of the May 2018 issue (Number 7) include: 
• Article, "Music as a Matter of Law," by Joseph P. Fishman  
• Article, "The Morality of Administrative Law," by Cass R. Sunstein & Adrian Vermeule  
• Book Review, "The Black Police: Policing Our Own," by Devon W. Carbado & L. Song Richardson 
• Note, "Section 230 as First Amendment Rule" 
In addition, the issue features extensive student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: a recent ruling that bystanders have a First Amendment right to record police but granting qualified immunity to police officers involved; whether a local (Massachusetts) drone ordinance is preempted by an FAA regulation; whether there is irreparable injury from a state's (Alabama's) lack of notice to people with felony convictions upon their re-enfranchisement; whether a state law (from South Dakota) is unconstitutional in requiring internet retailers without a physical presence in the state to remit sales tax (an issue currently before the U.S. Supreme Court); estate planning and digital inheritance, and whether personal representatives may provide lawful consent for the release of a decedent's emails; and finally whether a district court may use the policy of public understanding of the opioid epidemic to deny a plea bargain.  The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper eBook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is May 2018, the 7th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2400 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.
The Harvard Law Review's May 2017 issue, Number 7, features these contents: 

• Article, "A Contextual Approach to Harmless Error Review," by Justin Murray  

• Book Review, "Courting Abolition," by Deborah W. Denno 

• Book Review, "This Land Is My Land?" by Tracey Meares 

• Note, "Clarifying Kiobel's 'Touch and Concern' Test"  

• Note, "If These Walls Could Talk: The Smart Home and the Fourth Amendment Limits of the Third Party Doctrine"  

Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: trademark law and applying the Lanham Act to wholly foreign sales; election law and the test for partisan gerrymandering; civil procedure and whether service of process may be accomplished internationally via Twitter; felon disenfranchisement and the governor's clemency power; international law and sentencing for war crime of attacking cultural heritage; and international arbitration and whether Uruguay's anti-tobacco regulations violate Philip Morris's investment rights. Finally, the issue includes two summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the seventh issue of academic year 2016-2017. 

Much has changed in the area of school law since the first edition of The Educator's Guide was published in 1986. Successive editions grew incrementally longer to keep abreast of legal developments. In this new eighth edition, the authors have streamlined the discussion by pruning older material and weaving in new developments. The result is an authoritative source on all major dimensions of Texas school law that is both well integrated and easy to read.

Intended for Texas school personnel, school board members, interested attorneys, and taxpayers, the eighth edition explains what the law is and what the implications are for effective school operations. It is designed to help professional educators avoid expensive and time consuming lawsuits by taking effective preventive action. It is an especially valuable resource for school law courses and staff development sessions.

The eighth edition begins with a review of the legal structure of the Texas school system. As Chapter 1 notes, education law is a complex interweaving of state and federal constitutional, statutory, administrative, and judicial law. It is important to understand the nature of the system before reading other sections.

Successive chapters address attendance and the instructional program, the education of children with special needs, employment and personnel, expression and associational rights, the role of religion in public schools, student discipline, open meetings and records, privacy, search and seizure, and legal liability under both federal and Texas law. In addition to state law, the book addresses the role of the federal government in school operation through such major federal legislation as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Statute and case references are kept as simple as possible, and a complete index of case citations is included for those readers who wish to consult the cases themselves. The appendices describe how case law is reported and where to find it, along with a glossary of legal terms and a listing of other sources on Texas school law.

The Harvard Law Review, January 2015, No. 3 of Volume 128, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include: 

• Article, “Uncovering Coordinated Interagency Adjudication,” by Bijal Shah 

• Note, “Deference and the Federal Arbitration Act: The NLRB’s Determination of Substantive Statutory Rights”  

• Note, “Education Policy Litigation as Devolution”

• Note, “Physically Intrusive Abortion Restrictions as Fourth Amendment Searches and Seizures” 

• Note, “Copyright Reform and the Takings Clause”

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases and policy resolutions, including such subjects as constitutional protection for teacher tenure, suspicionless street stop of suspect’s companion, warrants to search foreign emails, confrontation clause in sentence selection phase of capital case, subject matter jurisdiction of tribal courts, physician inquiries into gun ownership and freedom of speech, reviewability of FDA inaction on pet drug products, and veto of a UN Security Council resolution on Syrian conflict. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications.   

The Harvard Law Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The Review comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This issue of the Review is January 2015, the third issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128). The digital edition features active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting.

The contents of the May 2018 issue (Number 7) include: 
• Article, "Music as a Matter of Law," by Joseph P. Fishman  
• Article, "The Morality of Administrative Law," by Cass R. Sunstein & Adrian Vermeule  
• Book Review, "The Black Police: Policing Our Own," by Devon W. Carbado & L. Song Richardson 
• Note, "Section 230 as First Amendment Rule" 
In addition, the issue features extensive student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: a recent ruling that bystanders have a First Amendment right to record police but granting qualified immunity to police officers involved; whether a local (Massachusetts) drone ordinance is preempted by an FAA regulation; whether there is irreparable injury from a state's (Alabama's) lack of notice to people with felony convictions upon their re-enfranchisement; whether a state law (from South Dakota) is unconstitutional in requiring internet retailers without a physical presence in the state to remit sales tax (an issue currently before the U.S. Supreme Court); estate planning and digital inheritance, and whether personal representatives may provide lawful consent for the release of a decedent's emails; and finally whether a district court may use the policy of public understanding of the opioid epidemic to deny a plea bargain.  The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper eBook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is May 2018, the 7th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2400 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.
The contents of the June 2018 issue (Number 8) include: 

• Article, "Harmless Errors and Substantial Rights," by Daniel Epps  

• Article, "Presidential Norms and Article II," by Daphna Renan  

• Article, "Abstention in the Time of Ferguson," by Fred O. Smith, Jr.    

• Book Review, "Facts, Values, Justification, Democracy," by Don Herzog 

• Note, "How Crime Pays: The Unconstitutionality of Modern Civil Asset Forfeiture as a Tool of Criminal Law Enforcement" 

• Note, "RCRA as a Tool for Environmental Justice Communities and Others to Compel Climate Change Adaptation" 

• Note, "The Presumption of Regularity in Judicial Review of the Executive Branch" 

The issue includes In Memoriam contributions about the life, judicial legacy, mentorship, and scholarship of Judge Stephen Reinhardt of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Contributors include Justice Anthony Kennedy, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Judge David Barron, Michael Dorf, Heather Gerken, Andrew Crespo, Benjamin Sachs, and Adriaan Lanni.  

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases, exploring such subjects as whether a multimonth leave of absence is a reasonable accommodation under the ADA, and whether a licensing requirement for African-style hair braiders survives a constitutional challenge under rational basis review. Finally, the issue includes a comprehensive Index to Volume 131 (2017-2018).  

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is June 2018, the final issue of academic year 2017-2018. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.

The contents for the February 2018 issue (Number 4) include: 

• Article, “Are We Running out of Trademarks? An Empirical Study of Trademark Depletion and Congestion,” by Barton Beebe & Jeanne C. Fromer 

• Article, “Agency Fees and the First Amendment,” by Benjamin I. Sachs  

• Book Review, “Unsettling History,” by Jennifer M. Chacón 

• Note, “Bail Reform and Risk Assessment: The Cautionary Tale of Federal Sentencing” 

In addition, the issue includes several commentaries on Recent Cases, analyzing such subjects as: political rights and nonapportionment in Puerto Rico; asserting conspiracy-of-silence claim when prevented from witnessing a search; constitutionality of routine shackling in pretrial proceedings; sovereign immunity as applied to Ethiopia in hacking suit; harms-of-abatement doctrine and due process; and whether aggregate term-of-years sentences implicate Eighth Amendment restrictions on juvenile life without parole. Finally the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is February 2018, the 4th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.

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