Body Art

Owen Jones
Free sample

 I hope that you will find the information helpful, useful and profitable.

The information in this ebook on various aspects of body art and related subjects, such as piercing and tattoos, is organized into 16 chapters of about 500-600 words each.

I hope that it will interest those who like to write a diary and blog, or would like to, plus webmasters who need content for their online publications.

So, as an added bonus, I am granting you permission to use the content on your own website or in your own blogs and newsletter, although it is better if you rewrite them in your own words first.

You may also split the book up and resell the articles. In fact, the only right that you do not have is to resell or give away the book as it was delivered to you.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Owen Jones
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Published on
Apr 27, 2016
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Pages
40
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / Body Art & Tattooing
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Owen Jones
Lek was born the eldest child of four in a typical rice farming family. She did not expect to do anything any different from the other girls in her class in the northern rice belt of Thailand.

Typically that would be: work in the fields for a few years; have a few babies; give them to mum to take care of and get back to work until her kids had their own children and it would be her turn to stop working to take care of them.

One day a catastrophe occurred out of the blue – her father died young and with huge debts that the family knew nothing about. Lek was twenty and she was the only one who could prevent foreclosure. However, the only way she knew was to go to work in her cousin’s bar in Pattaya.

She went as a waitress-cum-cashier, but when she realised that she was pregnant by her worthless, estranged husband, things had to change. She had the baby, gave it to her mother to look after and went back to work. However, now she needed real money to provide a better life for her child and to make up for spending its whole youth 500 miles away. She drifted into the tourist sex industry.

The book relates some of her ‘adventures’, her dreams and nightmares and her ‘modus operandi’. It tries to show, from Lek’s point of view, what it really is like to be a Thai bar girl – the hopes and frustrations, the hopes and the let-downs, the hopes and the lies and deceit that are part of her every day life.

One day she meets a man she likes and he likes her too. Nothing new there, it had happened hundreds of times before, but she feels that it is different this time. They have a wonderful four weeks together and then he goes home – as they all had, leaving more promises and more hopes. This one returns, but real life with a real boyfriend is not as easy as she had dreamed it would be. They go through good and bad times, but will they stay together and for how long?

After all she has been through, will she be able to be a regular girlfriend or even a wife again? Will she ever really be able to trust a man enough again either? Or would she be better off giving up her dreams and carrying on working in the bar?

Lek begins to find out that getting what you wish for is not always as good as you thought it would be.

'Behind the Smile' refers to the fact that Thailand is known the world over as 'The Land of Smiles'.
Owen Jones
Lily was born in south-eastern Isaan near the Mekong River, the only daughter of Chinese-Thais who owned a shop in their small village.

Her parents had a close friend that Lily called Uncle who used to smile at her and take her gifts as a small child.

However, when she was just eleven years old the nature of the gifts changed and there was always a price to pay for them that Lily hated.

Dare she risk upsetting her parents by telling them about it?

An accident of fate at school gave Lily an idea how to put an end to the problem once and for all and her parents came to realise what had been going on in their daughter's life.

Soon after the incident, Lily's father died. Some said from shame. Lily herself was given compensation which she wanted to use to change her life. Her decision was to go to University in Bangkok.

It was there that she realised that the compensation, which had seemed a fortune in the village, would not be enough to fund her University life in full and she descended into the seamier side of Bangkok life.

A serial killer is taking the life of men in Bangkok and the city is rightly scared. Not only are the men marked in death but a trademark flower is left at the scene of each killing.

The press says this is the most frightening serial killer since the cannibal child killer, Si Ouey Sae Urng of the 1950's.

Fear haunts the City and no-one knows who will die next or how the victims are chosen.

The police are baffled and the citizens of Bangkok cower behind closed doors fearful for their lives.
Michael Owen Jones
The first book of its kind, Putting Folklore to Use provides guidance to folklorists but also informs practitioners in other fields about how to use folklore studies to augment their own studies. How can acting like a folklore fieldworker help a teacher reduce inter-group stereotyping and increase student's self-esteem? How can adopting a folklore fieldworker's point of view when interviewing patients help practitioners render health care more effectively? How can using folklore research help rural communities survive and thrive?

Thirteen folklorists provide answers to these and other questions and demonstrate the many ways folklore can be put to use. Their essays, commissioned for this volume and edited by Michael Owen Jones, apply the methods and insights of modern folklore research to thirteen different professions and areas of practical concern. The authors, all of whom have themselves put folklore to use in the fields they describe, consider applications in detail and explain how folkloristic concepts and techniques can enhance the work of various professions. They explore applications in such areas as museums, aiding the homeless, environmental planning, art therapy, designing public spaces, organization development, tourism, the public sector, aging, and creating an occupation's image.

In an extensive introduction to the volume, Jones provides an overview of applied folkloristics that defines the field, surveys its history in the United States, and scrutinizes its basic issues and premises. Part I of the book shows how to promote learning, problem solving, and cultural conservation through folklore and its study. Part II deals with folklorists helping to improve the quality of life. Part III reveals folklore's role in enhancing identity and community.

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