The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of the Psychology of Coaching and Mentoring

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A state-of-the-art reference, drawing on key contemporary research to provide an in-depth, international, and competencies-based approach to the psychology of coaching and mentoring.
  • Puts cutting-edge evidence at the fingertips of organizational psychology practitioners who need it most, but who do not always have the time or resources to keep up with scholarly research
  • Thematic chapters cover theoretical models, efficacy, ethics, training, the influence of emerging fields such as neuroscience and mindfulness, virtual coaching and mentoring and more
  • Contributors include Anthony Grant, David Clutterbuck, Susan David, Robert Garvey, Stephen Palmer, Reinhard Stelter, Robert Lee, David Lane, Tatiana Bachkirova and Carol Kauffman
  • With a Foreword by Sir John Whitmore
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About the author

Jonathan Passmore is one of the UK’s foremost leadership coaches with a wealth of private sector and academic experience. His prolific research, writing, consultancy, and worldwide speaking engagements have made him a recognized authority on coaching and organizational change. His many books and articles include the best-selling text Excellence in Coaching (2006).

David Peterson is executive director of coaching and leadership at Google, Inc. A recognized pioneer in the field of executive coaching, he has a PhD. in industrial/organizational and counseling psychology. David has conducted ground-breaking research in leadership development and is the author of several best-selling books and many articles on the topic.

Teresa Freire is Assistant Professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Minho, Portugal, where she coordinates research on positive psychology, leads the university’s peer tutoring and coaching project and directs its Psychological Counseling Service. She has published widely, and is a management board committee member of the European Network for Positive Psychology (ENPP).

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Additional Information

John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Sep 24, 2012
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Psychology / Applied Psychology
Psychology / Industrial & Organizational Psychology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The Drake Relays are one of the iconic events of track and field in the United States. World and Olympic champions test their speed and stamina on the famed Blue Oval in Des Moines, Iowa, every April, and by spring 2013 they had set fourteen world records and fifty-one American records. But unlike most other top meets, this one also features college athletes from all over the country and high school athletes from across Iowa, giving them the experience of a lifetime—competing on the same track with the elite in their sport. This mix brings many enthusiastic spectators to the stadium and makes for an unusually close bond between fans and athletes—it’s as if everyone’s family is there cheering.

Pulitzer Prize–winning photographer David Peterson has been covering the Drake Relays for nearly forty years, but his love affair with the meet started earlier, when he ran on three winning relay teams there for Kansas State University. Now, drawing upon an unmatched personal archive, he offers the pictures of a lifetime spent on the Blue Oval. He captures on camera athletes of all levels in triumph and defeat, in mid-stride or leap, embracing their fans, their moms and dads, and their kids. In addition to the stars of the past, such as Carl Lewis, Suzy Favor Hamilton, and Herschel Walker, and those of the ’00s, like Lolo Jones and Jeremy Wariner, we see teenagers who may be the stars of the future, as well as the many athletes who will never be famous but nonetheless show themselves—and their sport—at their best.

A beautiful celebration of the Drake Relays and the diverse sports that make up “track and field,” this book will evoke memories and inspire runners, throwers, and jumpers everywhere.
It was 1869 and Sarah Moses, with "a very black eye," told her father: The world will never know what trouble I have seen. What she'd seen was violence at the hands of her husband. Does the world know any more of such things today than it did in Sarah's time?

Sarah, it so happens, lived in Oregon, that Edenic state on the Pacific Coast, and it is here that David Peterson del Mar centers his history of violence against wives. What causes such violence? Has it changed over time? How does it relate to the state of society as a whole? And how have women tried to stop it, resist it, escape it? These are the questions Peterson del Mar pursues, and the answers he finds are as fascinating as they are disturbing.

Thousands of thickly documented divorce cases from the Oregon circuit courts let us listen to voices who often go unheard. These are the people who didn't keep diaries or leave autobiographies, who sometimes could not write at all. Here they speak of a society that quietly condoned wife beating until the spread of an ethos of self-restraint in the late nineteenth century. And then, Peterson del Mar finds, the practice increased with a vengeance with the florescence of expressive individualism during the twentieth century.

What Trouble I Have Seen also traces a dramatic shift in wives' response to their husbands' violence. Settler and Native American women commonly fought abusive mates. Most wives of the late nineteenth century acted more cautiously and relied on others for protection. But twentieth-century privatism, Peterson del Mar discovers, often isolated modern wives from family and neighbors, casting abused women on the mercy of the police, women's shelters, and, most important, their own resources. Thus a new emphasis on self-determination, even as it stimulated violence among men, enhanced the ability of women to resist and escape violent husbands.

The first sustained history of violence toward wives, What Trouble I Have Seen offers remarkable testimony to the impact of social trends on the most private arrangements, and the resilience of women subject to a seemingly timeless crime.

Table of Contents:



"To Maintain His Authority": The Settlement Era
"When a Man Stoops to Strike a Woman": The 1890s
"His Face Is Weak and Sensual": Portland and the Whipping Post Law
"To Use His Muscle on Her": 1920-1945
"We Found That We Were Not Alone": The Years after World War II


Appendix: Quantitative Measures

Reviews of this book:
Del Mar offers a history of woman battering in Oregon that is compassionate, richly detailed, [and] complex...The richness of this historical examination will be of great interest to scholars and students of gender, family life, and violence against women.
--James Ptacek, Contemporary Sociology

Reviews of this book:
This is a fascinating book, with a bold and clear argument and a host of insights into family life and standards...It is stimulating, often plausible, and important.
--Peter N. Stearns, American Historical Review

Reviews of this book:
What Trouble I Have Seen weaves together an extraordinary mix of contradictory threads in the histories of violence, westward expansion, race, economics, gender roles, work, attitudes about marriage and women, and changes in the economy to explain historical changes in violence against wives. It is both a local history of Oregon and a larger social analysis of changing national patterns. It is solid scholarship with an activist aim at understanding the problem in order to solve it. The complexity of Peterson Del Mar's argument is commendable. He covers the incidence and nature of male violence against wives, women's resistance to it and societal interventions in violent marriages...What Trouble I Have Seen is an immensely useful book. Peterson Del Mar's thesis regarding historical changes in the level and nature of violence against wives is a much needed contribution, as he ties together disparate changes in society. His careful reading of legal documents blended with a variety of popular culture sources gives us greater insight into the problem.
--Deborah L. Kitchen, Journal of American Culture

Reviews of this book:
What Trouble I Have Seen is informed by the author's wide reading in anthropology and related disciplines which offer insight into domestic violence and, unusually, by a year Peterson del Mar spent as a counsellor to abusive men. No doubt that work heightened his sensitivity to some of the issues; it also led him to conclude that the beliefs of abusive men regarding women are not much different from those of other men...This is an ambitious and important book, the first detailed study of wife abuse in one state over a long period.
--Jerome Nadelahft, Canadian Review of American Studies

Reviews of this book:
In What Trouble I Have Seen, Peterson Del Mar paints an extraordinary landscape of men's violence against wives, the forms of women's resistance to male violence, and nonviolent men's complicity with the ideas that underpin such violence...Peterson Del Mar's writing is clear and often moving. His effective use of the testimonies of those who have seen trouble, those who have meted out trouble, and those who have relegated it makes this a compelling read.
--Carole J. Sheffield, Signs

Reviews of this book:
[A] groundbreaking study...David Peterson del Mar has succeeded in his aim of bringing research in this tender subject to the fore. He has produced a book of notable worth containing research that is highly readable, thought-provoking and relevant to modern society.
--Icarus [UK]

A fascinating and rich study of violence against women, meticulously researched and replete with the voices of men and women who offer insights into their own lives and struggles. Peterson del Mar has crafted a careful social history, one in which he argues and demonstrates cogently that violence against wives and wives' response to that violence have varied over time and have always been shaped by the social context--material, ideological, environmental, political.
--Regina Morantz-Sanchez, University of Michigan

Provides a historical framework for understanding domestic abuse that shows how the climate of the times shapes the way we understand [such] abuse.
--Elizabeth Pleck, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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