Few books have had the global impact of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century. An overnight bestseller, Piketty’s assessment that inherited wealth will always grow faster, on average, than earned wealth has energised debate. Hailed as ‘bigger than Marx’ (The Economist) or dismissed as ‘medieval’ (Wall Street Journal), the book is widely acknowledged as having significant economic and political implications.

Collected in this BWB Text are responses to this phenomenon from a diverse range of New Zealand economists and commentators. These voices speak independently to the relevance of Piketty’s conclusions. Is New Zealand faced with a one-way future of rising inequality? Does redistribution need to focus more on wealth, rather than just income? Was the post-war Great Convergence merely an aberration and is our society doomed to regress into a new Gilded Age?

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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Oct 23, 2014
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781927277713
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economics / Theory
Business & Economics / Labor
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty | Summary & Analysis

 

Preview:


Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is a study of inequity, both historically and in the present. The book describes how the concentration of wealth has changed over time. Its central thesis is that return on capital is greater than growth over time, which means that capital and inequality inevitably increase. The book also considers the ways governments might address the increasing concentration of wealth in the future.

Many economists have argued that increasing worker productivity in the modern era will inevitably result in reduced inequality. The historical record suggests that this is untrue. For most of history, there has been a huge gap between the rich and poor with no real middle class.

That changed in developed countries during the twentieth century for a number of reasons. First, two world wars caused massive shocks to the status quo and resulted in severe losses to many holders of capital…

 

PLEASE NOTE: This is key takeaways and analysis of the book and NOT the original book.

 

Inside this Instaread Summary of Capital in the Twenty-First Century:

 

·      Overview of the Book

·      Important People

·      Key Takeaways

·      Analysis of Key Takeaways

 

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