In Translation – Reflections, Refractions, Transformations

Benjamins Translation Library

Book 71
John Benjamins Publishing
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With contributions by researchers from India, Europe, North America and the Caribbean, In Translation – Reflections, refractions, transformations touches on questions of method and on topics – including copyright, cultural hybridity, globalization, identity construction, and minority languages – which are important for the disciplinary development of translation studies but also of interest to other fields as well, most notably comparative literature, cultural studies and world literature. The volume provides a forum for new voices to be heard alongside those of well-established scholars and for current concerns to express themselves, often focusing on practices in areas of the world other than Europe or North America, which have until now tended to dominate the field. Acknowledging difference and celebrating it, the contributions conceive of translation as a process which reconstitutes and transforms, which brings renewal and growth, an interaction in a new context, a new reading, a new writing.
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Additional Information

Publisher
John Benjamins Publishing
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Published on
May 16, 2007
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Pages
313
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ISBN
9789027292520
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Translating & Interpreting
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This content is DRM protected.
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This volume offers a comprehensive view of current research directions in Translation and Interpreting Studies, outlining the theoretical concepts underpinning that research and presenting detailed discussions of the various methods used.

Organized around three factors that are responsible for shaping the study of translation and interpreting today—post-positivist theoretical approaches, developments in the language industry, and technological innovations—this volume is divided into three parts:

Part I introduces the basic concepts organizing translation and interpreting research, such as the difference between qualitative and quantitative research, between product-oriented and process-oriented studies, and between prescriptive and descriptive approaches.

Part II provides a theoretical mapping of current translation and interpreting research, covering the theories underlying the current conceptualization of translation and interpreting, from queer studies to cognitive science.

Part III explores the key methodological approaches to research in Translation and Interpreting Studies, including corpus-based, longitudinal, observational, and ethnographic studies, as well as survey and focus group-based studies.

The international range of contributors are all leading research experts who use the methodologies in their work. They present the research aims of these methods, offer sample research questions that can—and cannot—be addressed by these methods, and discuss modes of data collection and analysis. This is an essential reference for all advanced undergraduates, postgraduates, and researchers in Translation and Interpreting Studies.

The boom in international trade has brought with it an increased demand for addressing local consumers in their native language and cultural idiom. Given the complex nature and new media involved in communicating with their constituent markets, companies are developing ever more complex tools and techniques for managing foreign-language communication. This book presents select case studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art of language management. It covers a cross-section of sectors, each of which has particular subtleties in language management:
• software localization
• finance
• medical devices
• automotive

The book also covers a cross-section of topical and strategic issues:
• time-to-market (scheduling challenges; simultaneous release in multiple languages)
• global terminology management
• leveraging Internet, intranet, and email
• centralized versus decentralized management models
• financial and budgeting techniques
• human factors; management issues unique to language projects
• technological innovation in language management (terminology tools, automatic translation)

The target audience is language professionals involved with the management aspect of language projects. This includes translators and linguists, managers at language-service providers, language managers at manufacturing/service companies, educators and language/translation students.
The heart of the book is the concept of the case study, particularly the Harvard Business School case-study model. Industry leaders and analysts provide some 15 case studies covering the spectrum of language applications. Readable and nonacademic — it can serve both as a text for those studying language and translation, as well as those in the field who need to know the “state-of-the-art” in language management.
The contributors to this volume see translation as an activity that takes place not in an ideal neutral site but in real social and political situations, with parties who have vested interests in the production and reception of texts across linguistic and cultural boundaries. Translation is not simply a process of faithful reproduction but invariably involves deliberate acts of selection, construction, and omission. It is inextricably linked to issues of cultural dominance, assertion, and resistance -- in short, to power.

Although governments, churches, publishing firms, and other powerful institutions may influence the translation process, many translators have found ways to resist that influence and have used translation to introduce new ideas and modes of expression. Exploring the nexus of translation and power, the essays in this volume offer a wide variety of examples, across multiple languages and societies. They range from case studies of historical episodes in which translation has played a role in the assertion of political and military power, such as an 1840 treaty between the British and Maori that continues to be a source of conflict in present-day New Zealand, to analyses of the work of specific translators, such as Germaine de Staël and Gayatri Spivak. Along with examining how translation contributes to ideological negotiations and cultural struggles, the essays reveal the dimensions of power inherent in the translation process itself -- in the relationship of translator to author, source text, and translated text.

In addition to the editors, contributors include Rosemary Arrojo, Michael Cronin, Sabine Fenton, Camino Gutiérrez Lanza, Christopher Larkosh, Alexandra Lianeri, Lin Kenan, Carol Maier, Paul Moon, Adriana S. Pagano, and Sherry Simon.

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