British Fortifications Through the Reign of Richard III: An Illustrated History

McFarland
Free sample

From the time the Romans first set foot on England’s shore in 55 B.C., the British Isles have faced a constant threat of foreign invasion. As a result, the landscapes of England, Scotland, and Ireland are dotted with ancient defensive fortifications as varied as their makers. Iron Age Celtic “hill forts,” Roman castra and Hadrian’s Wall, Anglo-Saxon dykes and Alfredian burhs, Norman mottes and stone-keeps, Edwardian castles, Irish tower houses—they all served to repel ancient intruders and many still stand as tangible relics of a remarkable past. This study chronicles the development of British fortifications from prehistoric times through the end of Richard III’s reign in 1485, providing the history of each type of structure, relevant examples, and information on weapons and siege warfare. More than 250 illustrations vividly detail each ediface’s construction and configuration.
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About the author

Historian, writer and illustrator Jean-Denis G.G. Lepage is the author of numerous books. His interests include World War II and medieval and French history. He lives in Groningen, Netherlands.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Dec 8, 2011
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Pages
318
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ISBN
9780786462544
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Medieval
History / Military / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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NOTE: This edition does not include color images.
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