The Great Fragmentation: And Why the Future of Business is Small

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Doing business in the digital age

The Great Fragmentation: And Why the Future of All Business is Small is a business survival manifesto for the technology revolution. As the world moves from the industrial era to the digital age, power is shifting and fragmenting. Power is no longer about might and ownership; power in a digital world is about access. Existing businesses need to understand this shift and position themselves to survive and thrive in an environment where entrepreneurs and start-ups enabled by access to technology are genuine threats.

Author Steve Sammartino is widely regarded as a thought leader on the subject of technology and business, and helps companies transition from industrial-era thinking to the mindset and processes required to compete in today's digital marketplace. The Great Fragmentation shows how technological changes such as Big Data, gamification, crowdfunding, Bitcoin, 3D printing, social media, mashup culture and artisanal production will forever change business and the way we live our lives.

  • Examine how the digital era has altered where we work, how we work, where we live and what we do
  • Discover how the digital era has impacted social and economic structures, including educational systems, financial systems and government policy
  • Understand that the social media and collecting 'friends' is just the tip of the iceberg in a digital business environment

Weaving together insights from business, technology and anthropology, The Great Fragmentation provides both corporations and entrepreneurs with a playbook for the future of work, life and business in the digital era.

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About the author

STEVE SAMMARTINO had his first startup before the age of10, running an organic egg farm in the 1970s before the words‘organic’ or ‘startup’ had been invented.He now travels the world helping companies transition fromindustrial era thinking to the digital age. He is an expert on theshift to the digital and connected economy, and loves helpingpeople make sense of it all. Read Steve’s blog atwww.stevesammartino.com

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Jun 26, 2014
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9780730312703
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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