Land Divided by Law: The Yakama Indian Nation as Environmental History, 1840-1933

Quid Pro Books
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Wester's environmental history of Yakama and Euro-American cultural interactions during the 19th and early 20th century explores the role of law in both curtailing and promoting rights to subsistence resources within a market economy. Her study, using original source files, case histories, and contemporary writings, particularly describes how the struggle to assert treaty rights both sprang from and impacted the daily lives of the Yakama people.

The study is now widely available in this new digital edition (and in paperback), adding a 2014 foreword by Harry Scheiber, professor of law and history at Berkeley. This book, he writes, “is a masterful study of the complex, extended series of confrontations between the native Indian cultures of the Yakima region and the regime of the conquering white nation. Her analysis is based on a blending of materials from rich archival sources and from the literatures of legal history, administrative history, anthropology, ecology, and cultural theory. Most remarkably, the book makes important new contributions to all these fields of scholarship.”

"In her remarkable book Land Divided by Law, Barbara Leibhardt Wester eloquently portrays the Yakama Indians of the Columbia River Basin as actors defending a threatened, living landscape from encroachments by settlers. Using federal officials and the courts to advocate for their rights, they reasserted a spiritual heritage of the earth as body, heart, life, and breath. Anyone interested in Native peoples and their interactions with Euro-Americans will want to read this lively, engaging account."
—Carolyn Merchant
Professor of Environmental History,
University of California, Berkeley

"This is a remarkable work that brims with insight about the inter-relatedness of nature, work, law, and culture. Wester blends expertise in several different academic disciplines with a superb gift for narrative into her analysis of the Yakama people's defense of their traditional way of life. The book is a testament not only to the skill and resilience of its subjects but also to the power of the author's empathy and respect for them."
—Arthur F. McEvoy
Associate Dean for Research, and Paul E. Treusch Professor of Law,
Southwestern Law School

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About the author

Barbara Leibhardt Wester is an environmental lawyer and historian who works, writes, and creates textiles in northern Illinois, where she lives with her husband and a Siberian husky. She holds PhD and JD degrees from the University of California-Berkeley, and a BA in history from Northwestern University. She is also the author of the fictional adventure The Illuminatrix.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Quid Pro Books
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Published on
Nov 11, 2014
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Pages
300
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ISBN
9781610271417
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Native American
Law / Environmental
Law / Legal History
Political Science / Public Policy / Environmental Policy
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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