China's Lonely Revolution: The Local Communist Movement of Hainan Island, 1926-1956

SUNY Press
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 Presents a new view of the Chinese revolution through the lens of the local Communist movement in Hainan between 1926 and 1956.
Jeremy A. Murray’s study of local Communist revolutionaries in Hainan between 1926 and 1956 provides a window into the diversity and complexity of the Chinese revolution. Long at the margins of the Chinese state, Hainan was once known by mainlanders only for its malarial climate and fierce indigenous people. In spite of efforts by the Chinese Nationalists and the Japanese to exterminate Hainan’s Communists, the movement survived because of an alliance with the indigenous Li. For years it persevered, though in complete isolation from Communist headquarters on the mainland. Using Chinese-language sources, archival materials, and interviews, Murray draws a vivid picture of this movement from the Hainanese perspective, and broadens our understanding of how patriotism, Party loyalty, and Chinese identity have been experienced and interpreted in modern China. 
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About the author

 Jeremy A. Murray is Assistant Professor of History at California State University, San Bernardino.

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Additional Information

SUNY Press
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Published on
Mar 27, 2017
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History / Asia / China
History / Modern / 20th Century
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Eligible for Family Library

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Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction finalist

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