A Spirituality of Everyday Faith

Louvain theological & pastoral monographs

Book 23
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
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Because "spirituality" is such a ubiquitous term today, any attempt to elucidate it more fully is only to be welcomed. Volume 23 in the LTPM series represents a significant contribution in this regard. Beginning with the apostle Paul, Declan Marmion shows how the meaning of the term "spirituality" changed over the centuries. He then offers a useful working definition of spirituality and explores the complicated relationship between spirituality, academic theology, and religious experience. In the main body of the book, Marmion focuses on the spiritual basis of Karl Rahner's theology. Exhibiting a comprehensive knowledge of the primary and secondary literature in this area, Marmion uses Rahner's notion of spirituality to treat such important themes as the nature of God, mystical experience, prayer, love of neighbor, and more.
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About the author

Declan Marmion lectures in Systematic Theology at St Patricke's College, Maynooth and at the Milltown Institute, Dublin where he is Senior Lecturer. His publications include An Introduction to the Trinity (co-edited with Rik van Nieuwenhove, 2010), Christian Identity in a Postmodern Age: Celebrating the Legacies of Karl Rahner and Bernard Lonergan (2005), Theology in the Making: Biography, Contexts, Methods (2005) and A Spirituality of Everyday Faith: A Theological Investigation of the Notion of Spirituality in Karl Rahner (1998).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
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Published on
Dec 31, 1998
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Pages
816
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ISBN
9780802844897
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Theology / General
Religion / Faith
Religion / Spirituality
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For centuries, the Christian churches and Christian theology have sought to forge their own identity by challenging the identity of Judaism. Christians often inquired whether Israel was still the people of God, whether the church had replaced Israel. An affirmative answer to the latter inquiry is often described as the "theology of substitution": the church has taken Israel's place. The implication is that there is no longer any place for Israel in God's plan of salvation. The history of Christian anti-Judaism is dramatic proof of the violent potential that is implicit in this Christian theology of substitution. After Auschwitz, the search for an alternative to this theology, a search which touches the heart of Christianity, has become a necessity. The central question of this book is whether - and how - Christianity can maintain its identity if it no longer understands itself as a substitute for Judaism. Didier Pollefeyt shows how the theme of substitution constitutes the basic theological problem for Christians in the encounter with Judaism. Bertold Klappert develops an alternative for the Christian theology of substitution by drawing on the work of Protestant theologians. Leon Klenicki offers a Jewish perspective, as he seeks to develop a theory of dialogical encounter for Jews and Christians. Terrence Merrigan reflects on the way in which the Christian rediscovery of Judaism can be significant in the light of the postmodern challenge of religious pluralism. Rik Hoet analyzes biblical metaphors which might serve as an alternative for the Christian theology of substitution.
What if our beliefs were not what divided us, but what pulled us together In Have a Little Faith, Mitch Albom offers a beautifully written story of a remarkable eight-year journey between two worlds--two men, two faiths, two communities--that will inspire readers everywhere. Albom's first nonfiction book since Tuesdays with Morrie, Have a Little Faith begins with an unusual request: an eighty-two-year-old rabbi from Albom's old hometown asks him to deliver his eulogy. Feeling unworthy, Albom insists on understanding the man better, which throws him back into a world of faith he'd left years ago. Meanwhile, closer to his current home, Albom becomes involved with a Detroit pastor--a reformed drug dealer and convict--who preaches to the poor and homeless in a decaying church with a hole in its roof. Moving between their worlds, Christian and Jewish, African-American and white, impoverished and well-to-do, Albom observes how these very different men employ faith similarly in fighting for survival: the older, suburban rabbi embracing it as death approaches; the younger, inner-city pastor relying on it to keep himself and his church afloat. As America struggles with hard times and people turn more to their beliefs, Albom and the two men of God explore issues that perplex modern man: how to endure when difficult things happen; what heaven is; intermarriage; forgiveness; doubting God; and the importance of faith in trying times. Although the texts, prayers, and histories are different, Albom begins to recognize a striking unity between the two worlds--and indeed, between beliefs everywhere. In the end, as the rabbi nears death and a harsh winter threatens the pastor's wobbly church, Albom sadly fulfills the rabbi's last request and writes the eulogy. And he finally understands what both men had been teaching all along: the profound comfort of believing in something bigger than yourself. Have a Little Faith is a book about a life's purpose; about losing belief and finding it again; about the divine spark inside us all. It is one man's journey, but it is everyone's story. Ten percent of the profits from this book will go to charity, including The Hole In The Roof Foundation, which helps refurbish places of worship that aid the homeless.
For centuries, the Christian churches and Christian theology have sought to forge their own identity by challenging the identity of Judaism. Christians often inquired whether Israel was still the people of God, whether the church had replaced Israel. An affirmative answer to the latter inquiry is often described as the "theology of substitution": the church has taken Israel's place. The implication is that there is no longer any place for Israel in God's plan of salvation. The history of Christian anti-Judaism is dramatic proof of the violent potential that is implicit in this Christian theology of substitution. After Auschwitz, the search for an alternative to this theology, a search which touches the heart of Christianity, has become a necessity. The central question of this book is whether - and how - Christianity can maintain its identity if it no longer understands itself as a substitute for Judaism. Didier Pollefeyt shows how the theme of substitution constitutes the basic theological problem for Christians in the encounter with Judaism. Bertold Klappert develops an alternative for the Christian theology of substitution by drawing on the work of Protestant theologians. Leon Klenicki offers a Jewish perspective, as he seeks to develop a theory of dialogical encounter for Jews and Christians. Terrence Merrigan reflects on the way in which the Christian rediscovery of Judaism can be significant in the light of the postmodern challenge of religious pluralism. Rik Hoet analyzes biblical metaphors which might serve as an alternative for the Christian theology of substitution.
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