The Gilded Age

ABC-CLIO
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The Gilded Age—the time between Reconstruction and the Spanish-American War—marked the beginnings of modern America. The advertising industry became an important part of selling the American Dream. Americans dined out more than ever before, and began to take leisure activities more seriously. Women's fashion gradually grew less restrictive, and architecture experienced an American Renaissance. Twelve narrative chapters chronicle how American culture changed and grew near the end of the 20th century. Included are chapter bibliographies, a timeline, a cost comparison, and a suggested reading list for students. This latest addition to Greenwood's American Popular Culture Through History series is an invaluable contribution to the study of American popular culture.

American Popular Culture Through History is the only reference series that presents a detailed, narrative discussion of U.S. popular culture. This volume is one of 17 in the series, each of which presents essays on Everyday America, The World of Youth, Advertising, Architecture, Fashion, Food, Leisure Activities, Literature, Music, Performing Arts, Travel, and Visual Arts

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About the author

Joel Shrock earned his PhD from Miami University and is currently an instructor of history at the Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities. He has authored an article on race and rape in silent film and co-authored another on student protest of the Vietnam War, which appears in the Greenwood Press volume of essays The Vietnam War on Campus: Other Voices, More Distant Drums. He is currently completing a manuscript on popular children's literature in the Gilded Age.

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Additional Information

Publisher
ABC-CLIO
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Published on
Jun 30, 2004
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Pages
344
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ISBN
9780313062216
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Popular Culture
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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