A History of the Czech Lands

Charles University in Prague, Karolinum Press
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Born January 1, 1993 after it split with Slovakia, the Czech Republic is one of the youngest members of the European Union. Despite its youth as a nation, this land and the areas just outside its modern borders boasts an ancient and intricate past. With A History of the Czech Lands, editors Jaroslav Pánek and Oldrich Tuma—along with several scholars from the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and Charles University—provide one of the most complete historical accounts of this region to date.

Pánek and Tuma’s history begins in the Neolithic era and follows the development of the state as it transformed into the Kingdom of Bohemia during the ninth century, into Czechoslovakia after World War I, and finally into the Czech Republic. Such a tumultuous political past arises in part from a fascinating native people, and A History of the Czech Lands profiles the Czechs in great detail, delving into past and present traditions and explaining how generation after generation adapted to a perpetually changing government and economy. In addition, Pánek and Tuma examine the many minorities that now call these lands home—Jews, Slovaks, Poles, Germans, Ukrainians, and others—and how each group’s migration to the region has contributed to life in the Czech Republic today.

The first study in English with this scope and ambition, A History of the Czech Lands is essential for scholars of Slavic, Central, and East European studies and a must-read for those who trace their ancestry to these lands
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About the author

Jaroslav Pánek is professor in the Institute of History and Oldřich Tůma is director of and a researcher in the Institute of Contemporary History, both at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Charles University in Prague, Karolinum Press
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Published on
Apr 15, 2019
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Pages
650
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ISBN
9788024622279
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Eastern
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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