A Long Saturday: Conversations

University of Chicago Press
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George Steiner is one of the preeminent intellectuals of our time. The Washington Post has declared that no one else “writing on literature can match him as polymath and polyglot, and few can equal the verve and eloquence of his writing,” while the New York Times says of his works that “the erudition is almost as extraordinary as the prose: dense, knowing, allusive.” Reading in many languages, celebrating the survival of high culture in the face of modern barbarisms, Steiner probes the ethics of language and literature with unparalleled grace and authority. A Long Saturday offers intimate insight into the questions that have absorbed him throughout his career.

In a stimulating series of conversations, Steiner and journalist Laure Adler discuss a range of topics, including Steiner’s boyhood in Vienna and Paris, his education at the University of Chicago and Harvard, and his early years in academia. Books are a touchstone throughout, but Steiner and Adler’s conversations also range over music, chess, psychoanalysis, the place of Israel in Jewish life, and beyond. Blending thoughts on subjects of broad interest in the humanities—the issue of honoring Richard Wagner and Martin Heidegger in spite of their politics, or Virginia Woolf’s awareness of the novel as a multivocal form, for example—with personal reflections on life and family, Steiner demonstrates why he is considered one of today’s greatest minds. Revealing and exhilarating, A Long Saturday invites readers to pull up a chair and listen in on a conversation with a master.
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About the author

George Steiner is extraordinary fellow at Churchill College at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of many books, including Martin Heidegger, Real Presences, and The Portage to San Cristobal of A. H., all also published by the University of Chicago Press. Laure Adler is a journalist and the author of several books. Teresa Lavender Fagan is a freelance translator living in Chicago.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Mar 8, 2017
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Pages
144
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ISBN
9780226350417
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Philosophers
Literary Criticism / General
Philosophy / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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From the Affordable Care Act to No Child Left Behind, politicians often face a puzzling problem: although most Americans support the aims and key provisions of these policies, they oppose the bills themselves. How can this be? Why does the American public so often reject policies that seem to offer them exactly what they want?
By the time a bill is pushed through Congress or ultimately defeated, we’ve often been exposed to weeks, months—even years—of media coverage that underscores the unpopular process of policymaking, and Mary Layton Atkinson argues that this leads us to reject the bill itself. Contrary to many Americans’ understandings of the policymaking process, the best answer to a complex problem is rarely self-evident, and politicians must weigh many potential options, each with merits and drawbacks. As the public awaits a resolution, the news media tend to focus not on the substance of the debate but on descriptions of partisan combat. This coverage leads the public to believe everyone in Washington has lost sight of the problem altogether and is merely pursuing policies designed for individual political gain. Politicians in turn exacerbate the problem when they focus their objections to proposed policies on the lawmaking process, claiming, for example, that a bill is being pushed through Congress with maneuvers designed to limit minority party input. These negative portrayals become linked in many people’s minds with the policy itself, leading to backlash against bills that may otherwise be seen as widely beneficial. Atkinson argues that journalists and educators can make changes to help inoculate Americans against the idea that debate always signifies dysfunction in the government. Journalists should strive to better connect information about policy provisions to the problems they are designed to ameliorate. Educators should stress that although debate sometimes serves political interests, it also offers citizens a window onto the lawmaking process that can help them evaluate the work their government is doing.
Esta es la summa del pensamiento de Steiner, una clase inigualable.The ObserverB+No nos quedan mas comienzosB; es la primera frase de este nuevo libro de George Steiner, que explora la idea de la creacion en el pensamiento, la literatura, la religion y la historia occidentales. Con altura intelectual y gran elegancia de estilo, Steiner nos sumerge en las fuerzas directrices del espiritu humano para reflexionar sobre los diferentes modos que hemos tenido de nombrar el principio, de designar el acto creador, en contrapunto con el cansancio que pesa sobre el espiritu de final del milenio, con su cambiante gramatica de discusiones acerca del fin del arte y del pensamiento de la civilizacion occidental.A traves de diversos temas "la Biblia, la historia de la ciencia y de las matematicas, la ontologia de Heidegger, la poesia de Paul Celan," Steiner examina la desesperanza que ha sembrado la duda racional a lo largo del siglo XX. Reconoce que, tal vez, la ciencia y la tecnologia hayan reemplazado al arte y la literatura como fuerzas conductoras de nuestra cultura, lo que trasluce una perdida significativa. Y, sin embargo, Steiner concluye esta obra mayor con una elocuente evocacion de como los comienzos, pese a todo, son interminables.George Steiner (Paris, 1929), hijo de judios vieneses, es uno de los mas reconocidos estudiosos de la cultura europea. De este autor Ediciones Siruela ha publicado Pasion intacta (1997) y Nostalgia del absoluto (2001), asi como su autobiografia Errata (1998), y proximamente Tolstoi y Dostoievski.Premio Principe de Asturias de Comunicacion y Humanidades 2001.
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