Density-Functional Theory of Atoms and Molecules

International Series of Monographs on Chemistry

Book 16
Oxford University Press
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This book is a rigorous, unified account of the fundamental principles of the density-functional theory of the electronic structure of matter and its applications to atoms and molecules. Containing a detailed discussion of the chemical potential and its derivatives, it provides an understanding of the concepts of electronegativity, hardness and softness, and chemical reactivity. Both the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham and the Levy-Lieb derivations of the basic theorems are presented, and extensive references to the literature are included. Two introductory chapters and several appendices provide all the background material necessary beyond a knowledge of elementary quantum theory. The book is intended for physicists, chemists, and advanced students in chemistry.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
May 26, 1994
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9780195357738
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Chemistry / Physical & Theoretical
Science / Physics / Atomic & Molecular
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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This book provides a penetrating and comprehensive description of energy selected reactions from a theoretical as well as experimental view. Three major aspects of unimolecular reactions involving the preparation of the reactants in selected energy states, the rate of dissociation of the activated molecule, and the partitioning of the excess energy among the final products, are fully discussed with the aid of 175 illustrations and over 1,000 references, most from the recent literature. Examples of both neutral and ionic reactions are presented. Many of the difficult topics are discussed at several levels of sophistication to allow access by novices as well as experts. Among the topics covered for the first time in monograph form is a discussion of highly excited vibrational/rotational states and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. Problems associated with the application of RRKM theory are discussed with the aid of experimental examples. Detailed comparisons are also made between different statistical models of unimolecular decomposition. Both quantum and classical models not based on statistical assumptions are described. Finally, a chapter devoted to the theory of product energy distribution includes the application of phase space theory to the dissociation of small and large clusters. The work will be welcomed as a valuable resource by practicing researchers and graduate students in physical chemistry, and those involved in the study of chemical reaction dynamics.
Since 1983 I have been delivering lectures at Budapest University that are mainly attended by chemistry students who have already studied quantum chem istry in the amount required by the (undergraduate) chemistry curriculum of the University, and wish to acquire deeper insight in the field, possibly in prepara tion of a master's or Ph.D. thesis in theoretical chemistry. In such a situation, I have the freedom to discuss, in detail, a limited number of topics which I feel are important for one reason or another. The exact coverage may vary from year to year, but I usually concentrate on the general principles and theorems and other basic theoretical results which I foresee will retain their importance despite the rapid development of quantum chemistry. I commonly organize my lectures by treating the subject from the begin ning, without referring explicitly to any actual previous knowledge in quantum chemistry-only some familiarity with its goals, approaches and, to a lesser ex tent, techniques is supposed. I concentrate on the formulae and their derivation, assuming the audience essentially understands the reasons for deriving these results. This book is basically derived from the material of my lectures. The spe cial feature, distinguishing it from most other textbooks, is that all results are explicitly proved or derived, and the derivations are presented completely, step by step. True understanding of a theoretical result can be achieved only if one has gone through its derivation.
Understanding Molecular Simulation: From Algorithms to Applications explains the physics behind the "recipes" of molecular simulation for materials science. Computer simulators are continuously confronted with questions concerning the choice of a particular technique for a given application. A wide variety of tools exist, so the choice of technique requires a good understanding of the basic principles. More importantly, such understanding may greatly improve the efficiency of a simulation program. The implementation of simulation methods is illustrated in pseudocodes and their practical use in the case studies used in the text.

Since the first edition only five years ago, the simulation world has changed significantly -- current techniques have matured and new ones have appeared. This new edition deals with these new developments; in particular, there are sections on:

Transition path sampling and diffusive barrier crossing to simulaterare eventsDissipative particle dynamic as a course-grained simulation techniqueNovel schemes to compute the long-ranged forcesHamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian dynamics in the context constant-temperature and constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulationsMultiple-time step algorithms as an alternative for constraintsDefects in solidsThe pruned-enriched Rosenbluth sampling, recoil-growth, and concerted rotations for complex moleculesParallel tempering for glassy Hamiltonians

Examples are included that highlight current applications and the codes of case studies are available on the World Wide Web. Several new examples have been added since the first edition to illustrate recent applications. Questions are included in this new edition. No prior knowledge of computer simulation is assumed.

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