Mothers, Daughters, and Body Image: Learning to Love Ourselves as We Are

Post Hill Press
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When women are told that what is important about us is how we look, it becomes increasingly difficult for us to feel comfortable with our appearance and how we feel about our bodies. We are told, over and over—if we just lost weight, fit into those old jeans, or into a new smaller pair—we will be happier and feel better about ourselves. The truth is, so many women despise their appearance, weight, and shape, that experts who study women’s body image now consider this feeling to be normal. 

But it does not have to be that way. It is possible for us as women to love ourselves, our bodies, as we are. We need a new story about what it means to be a woman in this world. Based on her original research, Hillary L McBride shares the true stories of young women, and their mothers, and provides unique insights into how our relationships with our bodies are shaped by what we see around us and the specific things we can do to have healthier relationships with our appearance, and all the other parts of ourselves that make us women.

 

In Mothers, Daughters, and Body Image McBride tells her own story of recovery from an eating disorder, and how her struggles led her to dream of a new vision for womanhood—from one without body shame, negative comparisons, or insecurities, to one of freedom, connection, and acceptance. 

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About the author

Hillary McBride is a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia in Counselling Psychology where she is continuing research she started for her masters exploring women’s experiences in and of the body, particularly at significant transitions points. McBride sees patients privately there for a variety of concerns including acute mental health issues. She works regularly with people struggling with depression, anxiety, life transitions, self-harm, abuse, relationship issues, and sexuality. She specializes in women’s issues from a feminist perspective. McBride has designed body image presentations for young girls and their mothers that she presents regularly in schools and community settings. She regularly speaks on radio, podcasts, and at workshops on a variety of mental health topics including sexuality, body image, well-being, living authentically, and healing trauma.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Post Hill Press
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Published on
Oct 31, 2017
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Pages
530
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ISBN
9781682613559
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Women
Health & Fitness / Women's Health
Psychology / Psychopathology / Eating Disorders
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Mainstream health science has let you down.

Weight loss is not the key to health, diet and exercise are not effective weight-loss strategies and fatness is not a death sentence.

You’ve heard it before: there’s a global health crisis, and, unless we make some changes, we’re in trouble. That much is true—but the epidemic is NOT obesity. The real crisis lies in the toxic stigma placed on certain bodies and the impact of living with inequality—not the numbers on a scale. In a mad dash to shrink our bodies, many of us get so caught up in searching for the perfect diet, exercise program, or surgical technique that we lose sight of our original goal: improved health and well-being. Popular methods for weight loss don’t get us there and lead many people to feel like failures when they can’t match unattainable body standards. It’s time for a cease-fire in the war against obesity.

Dr. Linda Bacon and Dr. Lucy Aphramor’s Body Respect debunks common myths about weight, including the misconceptions that BMI can accurately measure health, that fatness necessarily leads to disease, and that dieting will improve health. They also help make sense of how poverty and oppression—such as racism, homophobia, and classism—affect life opportunity, self-worth, and even influence metabolism.

Body insecurity is rampant, and it doesn’t have to be. It’s time to overcome our culture’s shame and distress about weight, to get real about inequalities and health, and to show every body respect.
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