Bats in the Anthropocene: Conservation of Bats in a Changing World

Springer

This book focuses on central themes related to the conservation of bats. It details their response to land-use change and management practices, intensified urbanization and roost disturbance and loss. Increasing interactions between humans and bats as a result of hunting, disease relationships, occupation of human dwellings, and conflict over fruit crops are explored in depth. Finally, contributors highlight the roles that taxonomy, conservation networks and conservation psychology have to play in conserving this imperilled but vital taxon.

With over 1300 species, bats are the second largest order of mammals, yet as the Anthropocene dawns, bat populations around the world are in decline. Greater understanding of the anthropogenic drivers of this decline and exploration of possible mitigation measures are urgently needed if we are to retain global bat diversity in the coming decades. This book brings together teams of international experts to provide a global review of current understanding and recommend directions for future research and mitigation.

Read more
Collapse

About the author

PD Dr. Christian C. Voigt is a senior research scientist at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin, Germany and founder and organizer of the International Berlin Bat Meetings. The meeting (‘Bats in the Anthropocene', 1.-3. March 2013) served as focal point for this book project. Dr. Voigt received his doctoral degree from the University of Erlangen, Germany, where he studied nectar-feeding bats. He is broadly interested in the eco-physiology, sociobiology and conservation of bats and has published more than 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals. Currently, he is serving as an associate editor for Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology and for Oecologia (between 2006 and 2011 also for Journal of Mammalogy). Dr. Tigga Kingston is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences Texas Tech University and a central figure for the conservation of bats in Southeast Asia, she is the founder and director of the Southeast Asian Bat Conservation Research Unit established with support from the National Science Foundation, USA, and has been the co-organizer of the 1st and 2nd Southeast Asian Bat Conferences held in Thailand and Indonesia. She has earned a PhD degree at Boston University where she studied bat assemblages in Peninsular Malaysia, and has published more than 40 papers in peer-reviewed journals and book. She serves on the advisory boards of Bat Conservation International and Lubee Bat Conservancy, and served for three years on the board of the North American Society for Bat Research. She is a member of the IUCN Chiroptera Specialist Group and is an author of 87 SE Asian Bat Red-list Accounts.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 7, 2015
Read more
Collapse
Pages
606
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9783319252209
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection
Science / Environmental Science
Science / Global Warming & Climate Change
Science / Life Sciences / Ecology
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / General
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / Mammals
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Just as World War II called an earlier generation to greatness, so the climate crisis is calling today's rising youth to action: to create a better future.

In UNSTOPPABLE, Bill Nye crystallizes and expands the message for which he is best known and beloved. That message is that with a combination of optimism and scientific curiosity, all obstacles become opportunities, and the possibilities of our world become limitless. With a scientist's thirst for knowledge and an engineer's vision of what can be, Bill Nye sees today's environmental issues not as insurmountable, depressing problems but as chances for our society to rise to the challenge and create a cleaner, healthier, smarter world. We need not accept that transportation consumes half our energy, and that two-thirds of the energy you put into your car is immediately thrown away out the tailpipe. We need not accept that dangerous emissions are the price we must pay for a vibrant economy and a comfortable life. Above all, we need not accept that we will leave our children a planet that is dirty, overheated, and depleted of resources. As Bill shares his vision, he debunks some of the most persistent myths and misunderstandings about global warming. When you are done reading, you'll be enlightened and empowered. Chances are, you'll be smiling, too, ready to join Bill and change the world.

In Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World, the New York Times bestselling author of Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation and former host of "Bill Nye the Science Guy" issues a new challenge to today's generation: to make a cleaner, more efficient, and happier world.


Praise for UNDENIABLE:

"With his charming, breezy, narrative style, Bill empowers the reader to see the natural world as it is, not as some would wish it to be. He does it right. And, as I expected, he does it best." -Neil deGrasse Tyson, Ph.D, host of COSMOS

"Bill Nye, 'the Science Guy,' has become a veritable cultural icon....[T]he title of his new book on evolution...[is] 'Undeniable,' because, yes, there are many Americans who still deny what Darwin and other scientists long ago proved." -Frank Bruni, The New York Times

"With a jaunty bow tie and boyish enthusiasm, Bill Nye the Science Guy has spent decades decoding scientific topics, from germs to volcanoes, for television audiences....In his new book, Nye delights in how [evolution] helps to unlock the mysteries of everything from bumblebees to human origins to our place in the universe." -National Geographic

"When it comes to Bill Nye, 'Science Guy' doesn't even begin to cover it. When he's not being summoned to act as a voice of reason for news outlets or leading meetings as CEO of the Planetary Society, he is living the life of a best-selling author....His recently published book, 'Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation,' enlightens readers while using a conversational, educational tone. After all, it's his ability to break down even the most complicated topics into bite-size pieces that made him such a hit on his '90s children's show 'Bill Nye, the Science Guy.'" -The Boston Globe

"Mr. Nye writes briskly and accessibly...[and] makes an eloquent case for evolution."-The Wall Street Journal

"Because [Bill Nye is] a scientist, he has no doubts that the 'deniers' of evolution are flat wrong. And because he's a performer, his book is fun to read and easy to absorb." -The Washington Post

"Ignite your inner scientist when Nye, known for delivering geeky intel with clarity and charm, takes on one of society's most hotly debated topics (yes, still)." -Time Out New York

The Man Who Planted Trees is the inspiring story of David Milarch’s quest to clone the biggest trees on the planet in order to save our forests and ecosystem—as well as a hopeful lesson about how each of us has the ability to make a difference.

“When is the best time to plant a tree? Twenty years ago. The second best time? Today.”—Chinese proverb
 
Twenty years ago, David Milarch, a northern Michigan nurseryman with a penchant for hard living, had a vision: angels came to tell him that the earth was in trouble. Its trees were dying, and without them, human life was in jeopardy. The solution, they told him, was to clone the champion trees of the world—the largest, the hardiest, the ones that had survived millennia and were most resilient to climate change—and create a kind of Noah’s ark of tree genetics. Without knowing if the message had any basis in science, or why he’d been chosen for this task, Milarch began his mission of cloning the world’s great trees. Many scientists and tree experts told him it couldn’t be done, but, twenty years later, his team has successfully cloned some of the world’s oldest trees—among them giant redwoods and sequoias. They have also grown seedlings from the oldest tree in the world, the bristlecone pine Methuselah.
 
When New York Times journalist Jim Robbins came upon Milarch’s story, he was fascinated but had his doubts. Yet over several years, listening to Milarch and talking to scientists, he came to realize that there is so much we do not yet know about trees: how they die, how they communicate, the myriad crucial ways they filter water and air and otherwise support life on Earth. It became clear that as the planet changes, trees and forest are essential to assuring its survival.

Praise for The Man Who Planted Trees
 
“This is a story of miracles and obsession and love and survival. Told with Jim Robbins’s signature clarity and eye for telling detail, The Man Who Planted Trees is also the most hopeful book I’ve read in years. I kept thinking of the end of Saint Francis’s wonderful prayer, ‘And may God bless you with enough foolishness to believe that you can make a difference in the world, so that you can do what others claim cannot be done.’ ”—Alexandra Fuller, author of Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight

“Absorbing, eloquent, and loving . . . While Robbins’s tone is urgent, it doesn’t compromise his crystal-clear science. . . . Even the smallest details here are fascinating.”—Dominique Browning, The New York Times Book Review

“The great poet W. S. Merwin once wrote, ‘On the last day of the world I would want to plant a tree.’ It’s good to see, in this lovely volume, that some folks are getting a head start!”—Bill McKibben, author of Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

“Inspiring . . . Robbins lucidly summarizes the importance and value of trees to planet Earth and all humanity.”—The Ecologist
 
“ ‘Imagine a world without trees,’ writes journalist Jim Robbins. It’s nearly impossible after reading The Man Who Planted Trees, in which Robbins weaves science and spirituality as he explores the bounty these plants offer the planet.”—Audubon
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.