Some Problems Christians Face

Scripture Truth
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"The Christian and Temptation", "The Christian and Hypocrisy", "The Christian and Commitment" and "The Christian and Conflict" together in one pocket-sized volume. Satan is a past master in the art of temptation. After all, he has had thousands of years of experience in thus opposing the people of God. None of us, in ourselves, is immune from his attacks. "The Christian and Temptation" helps us to understand the nature of temptation and looks at ways to overcome it. Reality or pretence? Do not read "The Christian and Hypocrisy" unless you are prepared to be challenged by it! It surveys the Bible's teaching on hypocrisy, a subject that is all too prevalent in today's world. "The Christian and Commitment" cuts right across the easy-going 'What's in it for me?' attitude that characterises much of 21st Century living. It calls for a thoroughgoing commitment to the Lord Jesus Christ. Read it and be challenged! "Divide and rule" seems to be Satan's policy in his attacks on the Church today. But why does his programme for conflict have to be so successful?  "The Christian and Conflict" takes a helpful look at the problems Christians face in getting on with one another.








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Publisher
Scripture Truth
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Pages
68
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ISBN
9780901860583
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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