Internet and Electronic Commerce Law in the European Union

Bloomsbury Publishing
Free sample

This book outlines and analyses the legislative activity of the Union in an area which is currently experiencing exponential growth in terms of both commercial activity and legal significance. The scope of the book is current,pending and proposed Internet-related law on contracts, copyright, data protection, commercial communications, financial services, electronic cash and electronic signatures.



John Dickie argues that the Union is in the process of displacing Member State autonomy in the regulation of the Internet. Within that frame, it is argued that there is a lack of focus on the individual in the electronic marketplace and a lack of co-ordination between relevant legislative instruments.



This book will be of interest to all those engaged with Union and Internet law, including lawyers, policy-makers and academics.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

John Dickie is a legal consultant and a former lecturer in law at the University of Leicester.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Aug 1, 1999
Read more
Collapse
Pages
256
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781847313041
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Law / Commercial / General
Law / Computer & Internet
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
A PDF version of this book is available for free in open access via www.tandfebooks.com as well as the OAPEN Library platform, www.oapen.org. It has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 license and is part of the OAPEN-UK research project.

E-commerce offers immense challenges to traditional dispute resolution methods, as it entails parties often located in different parts of the world making contracts with each other at the click of a mouse. The use of traditional litigation for disputes arising in this forum is often inconvenient, impractical, time-consuming and expensive due to the low value of the transactions and the physical distance between the parties. Thus modern legal systems face a crucial choice: either to adopt traditional dispute resolution methods that have served the legal systems well for hundreds of years or to find new methods which are better suited to a world not anchored in territorial borders.

Online Dispute Resolution (ODR), originally an off-shoot of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), takes advantage of the speed and convenience of the Internet, becoming the best, and often the only option for enhancing consumer redress and strengthening their trust in e-commerce. This book provides an in-depth account of the potential of ODR for European consumers, offering a comprehensive and up to date analysis of the development of ODR. It considers the current expansion of ODR and evaluates the challenges posed in its growth. The book proposes the creation of legal standards to close the gap between the potential of ODR services and their actual use, arguing that ODR, if it is to realise its full potential in the resolution of e-commerce disputes and in the enforcement of consumer rights, must be grounded firmly on a European regulatory model.

The development of new technologies places new challenges to the interpretation and implementation of legislation in the information society. The recent deployment of service-oriented computing and cloud computing for online commercial activities has urged countries to amend existing legislation and launch new regulations. With the exponential growth of international electronic commercial transactions, a consistent global standard of regulating the legal effects of electronic communications, the protection of data privacy security and the effectiveness of Internet-related dispute resolution are motivating factors to build users’ trust and confidence in conducting cross-border business and their sharing information online.

The second edition of this book continues taking a ‘solutions to obstacles’ approach and analyses the main legal obstacles to the establishment of trust and confidence in undertaking business online. In comparing the legislative frameworks of e-commerce in the EU, US, China and International Organisations, the book sets out solutions to modernise and harmonise laws at the national, regional and international levels in response to current technological developments. It specifically provides information on the key legal challenges caused by the increasing popularity of service-oriented computing and cloud computing as well as the growing number of cross-border transactions and its relation to data privacy protection, Internet jurisdiction, choice of law and online dispute resolution. It considers how greater legal certainty can be achieved in cloud computing service contracts and other agreements resulted in service-oriented computing.

The second edition of Law of Electronic Commercial Transactions is a clear and up to date account of a fast-moving area of study. It will be of great value to legislators, politicians, practitioners, scholars, businesses, individuals, postgraduate and undergraduate students. It provides in-depth research into finding solutions to remove eight generic legal obstacles in electronic commercial transactions and offers insights into policy making, law reforms, regulatory developments and self-protection awareness.

The incredible true story of the decade-long quest to bring down Paul Le Roux—the creator of a frighteningly powerful Internet-enabled cartel who merged the ruthlessness of a drug lord with the technological savvy of a Silicon Valley entrepreneur.

“A tour de force of shoe-leather reporting—undertaken, amid threats and menacing, at considerable personal risk.”—Los Angeles Times

It all started as an online prescription drug network, supplying hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of painkillers to American customers. It would not stop there. Before long, the business had turned into a sprawling multinational conglomerate engaged in almost every conceivable aspect of criminal mayhem. Yachts carrying $100 million in cocaine. Safe houses in Hong Kong filled with gold bars. Shipments of methamphetamine from North Korea. Weapons deals with Iran. Mercenary armies in Somalia. Teams of hit men in the Philippines. Encryption programs so advanced that the government could not break them.

The man behind it all, pulling the strings from a laptop in Manila, was Paul Calder Le Roux—a reclusive programmer turned criminal genius who could only exist in the networked world of the twenty-first century, and the kind of self-made crime boss that American law enforcement had never imagined.

For half a decade, DEA agents played a global game of cat-and-mouse with Le Roux as he left terror and chaos in his wake. Each time they came close, he would slip away. It would take relentless investigative work, and a shocking betrayal from within his organization, to catch him. And when he was finally caught, the story turned again, as Le Roux struck a deal to bring down his own organization and the people he had once employed.

Award-winning investigative journalist Evan Ratliff spent four years piecing together this intricate puzzle, chasing Le Roux’s empire and his shadowy henchmen around the world, conducting hundreds of interviews and uncovering thousands of documents. The result is a riveting, unprecedented account of a crime boss built by and for the digital age.

Praise for The Mastermind

“The Mastermind is true crime at its most stark and vivid depiction. Evan Ratliff’s work is well done from beginning to end, paralleling his investigative work with the work of the many federal agents developing the case against LeRoux.”—San Francisco Book Review (five stars)

“A wholly engrossing story that joins the worlds of El Chapo and Edward Snowden; both disturbing and memorable.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
 Introduction to Internet Scams and Fraud - Credit Card Theft, Work-At-Home Scams and Lottery Scams 
Table of Contents 
Introduction to Internet Scams and Fraud 
Getting to Know More about Internet Scams/Identity Theft/Credit Card Theft and Internet Frauds 
Difference between Internet scams And Internet Fraud 
Tips and Techniques to Recognize Frauds and Scams 
Rule number one – giving personal information out 
Rule number two – identification documents 
How does Internet fraud work? 
Lottery Scams 
Victim of Lottery Fraud? 
Giving Money Away Free Scam 
Protecting yourself from Internet fraud 
Part 2 
Credit card thefts/work-at-home scams/banks and scammers 
Work from Home Frauds – Facebook Fortune 
Country Oriented Work-At-Home Scams 
How to Recognize a Work-At-Home Scam 
Anti Internet Fraud agencies 
Social media advertising – YouTube etc. Promoting Scams 
Work-at-home programs 
Tips for Working at Home Jobs 
How to Trap Internet tricksters Through Social Media? 
How Do Banks Encourage Frauds? 
How Can a Bank Help in Catching a Scammer? 
Banking Laissez-faire attitudes 
Strict Ways of Tackling Credit Card Frauds 
Banking Secrets Unfolded 
Bank Update Frauds 
Conclusion 
Author Bio 
Publisher 

Introduction to Internet Scams and Frauds 

With the Internet becoming such an integral part of all our lives, is it a surprise that we are more vulnerable to Internet scams and Internet fraud. So for all those people who want to know about the different ways in which a person can get scammed through Internet scams and Internet fraud, here is a complete information dossier telling you all about identity thefts, credit card thefts, Internet fraud and Internet scams. 

Along with this, you are going to know more about how fraudsters can gain access to your bank account, thanks to emails which you demand information from you under the garb of updating your banking details and information. 

Ignorance is not bliss. In such cases you have to be one step ahead of all the scamsters who benefit from a credulous public who believe that if banking and financial company officials have written to you about a serious matter, it is serious. They thrive on such threatening and scare tactics, telling you that your account is going to be limited within three days or some such ultimatum. 

Remember that no bank or any other institution which has anything to do with money is going to ask you for your details, by asking you to update them online. Anybody with a little bit of common sense knows that any information which is sent online either through mail or through tapping on supposedly secure websites can be easily accessed by any hacker with a little bit of experience and computer know how. 

So apart from showing you ways and means with which you can check these Internet scamsters and credit card identity thieves, this book is going to give you information on how you can protect yourself from future financial losses.
Is the Internet erasing national borders? Will the future of the Net be set by Internet engineers, rogue programmers, the United Nations, or powerful countries? Who's really in control of what's happening on the Net? In this provocative new book, Jack Goldsmith and Tim Wu tell the fascinating story of the Internet's challenge to governmental rule in the 1990s, and the ensuing battles with governments around the world. It's a book about the fate of one idea--that the Internet might liberate us forever from government, borders, and even our physical selves. We learn of Google's struggles with the French government and Yahoo's capitulation to the Chinese regime; of how the European Union sets privacy standards on the Net for the entire world; and of eBay's struggles with fraud and how it slowly learned to trust the FBI. In a decade of events the original vision is uprooted, as governments time and time again assert their power to direct the future of the Internet. The destiny of the Internet over the next decades, argue Goldsmith and Wu, will reflect the interests of powerful nations and the conflicts within and between them. While acknowledging the many attractions of the earliest visions of the Internet, the authors describe the new order, and speaking to both its surprising virtues and unavoidable vices. Far from destroying the Internet, the experience of the last decade has lead to a quiet rediscovery of some of the oldest functions and justifications for territorial government. While territorial governments have unavoidable problems, it has proven hard to replace what legitimacy governments have, and harder yet to replace the system of rule of law that controls the unchecked evils of anarchy. While the Net will change some of the ways that territorial states govern, it will not diminish the oldest and most fundamental roles of government and challenges of governance. Well written and filled with fascinating examples, including colorful portraits of many key players in Internet history, this is a work that is bound to stir heated debate in the cyberspace community.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.