Becoming Subjects: Sexualities and Secondary Schooling

Routledge
Free sample

This book focuses on key contemporary discourses related to sexualities and schooling. Such discourses include: educational strategies used to support lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students; considerations of how educators might influence students' sexual identity; narratives of risk and violence often asociated with LGBT youth; stories of salvation and protection; as well as debates relating to the 'closet' and calls to 'come out' in the classroom. People often are left out of discussions of sexualities and schooling are also incorporated in this text.
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About the author

Mary Louise Rasmussen is a Senior Lecturer in Curriculum and Pedagogy at Monash University. She is the co-editor, with Susan Talburt and Eric Rofes, of Youth and Sexualities: Pleasure, Subversion and Insubordination In and Out of Schools. Currently her research focuses on the intersections between arts, identity and public pedagogies.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Nov 12, 2012
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781136081941
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Educational Policy & Reform / General
Education / Experimental Methods
Education / General
Education / Multicultural Education
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Although many schools and educational systems, from elementary to tertiary level, state that they endorse anti-homophobic policies, pedagogies and programs, there appears to be an absence of education about, and affirmation of, bisexuality and minimal specific attention paid to bi-phobia. Bisexuality appears to be falling into the gap between the binary of heterosexuality and homosexuality that informs anti-homophobic policies, programs, and practices in schools initiatives such as health education, sexuality education, and student welfare. These erasures and exclusions leave bisexual students, family members and educators feeling silenced and invisibilized within school communities. Also absent is attention to intersectionality, or how indigeneity, gender, class, ethnicity, rurality and age interweave with bisexuality. Indeed, as much research has shown, erasure, exclusion, and the absence of intersectionality have been considered major factors in bisexual young people, family members and educators in school communities experiencing worse mental, emotional, sexual and social health than their homosexual or heterosexual counterparts.

This book is the first of its kind, providing an international collection of empirical research, theory and critical analysis of existing educational resources relating to bisexuality in education. Each chapter addresses three significant issues in relation to bisexuality and schooling: erasure, exclusion, and the absence of intersectionality. From indigenous to rural schools, from tertiary campuses to elementary schools, from films to picture books as curriculum resources, from educational theory to the health and wellbeing of bisexual students, this book’s contributors share their experiences, expertise and ongoing questions.

This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Bisexuality.

How lessons from kindergarten can help everyone develop the creative thinking skills needed to thrive in today's society.

In kindergartens these days, children spend more time with math worksheets and phonics flashcards than building blocks and finger paint. Kindergarten is becoming more like the rest of school. In Lifelong Kindergarten, learning expert Mitchel Resnick argues for exactly the opposite: the rest of school (even the rest of life) should be more like kindergarten. To thrive in today's fast-changing world, people of all ages must learn to think and act creatively—and the best way to do that is by focusing more on imagining, creating, playing, sharing, and reflecting, just as children do in traditional kindergartens.

Drawing on experiences from more than thirty years at MIT's Media Lab, Resnick discusses new technologies and strategies for engaging young people in creative learning experiences. He tells stories of how children are programming their own games, stories, and inventions (for example, a diary security system, created by a twelve-year-old girl), and collaborating through remixing, crowdsourcing, and large-scale group projects (such as a Halloween-themed game called Night at Dreary Castle, produced by more than twenty kids scattered around the world). By providing young people with opportunities to work on projects, based on their passions, in collaboration with peers, in a playful spirit, we can help them prepare for a world where creative thinking is more important than ever before.

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