Social Investment: A New Zealand Policy Experiment

Bridget Williams Books
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The idea of social investment has obvious intuitive appeal. But is it robust? Is it built on sound philosophical principles and secure analytical foundations? Will it deliver better outcomes?

For almost a decade, the idea of social investment has been a major focus of New Zealand policy-making and policy debate. The broad aim has been to address serious social problems and improve long-term fiscal outcomes by drawing on big data and deploying various analytical techniques to enable more evidence-informed policy interventions.

But recent approaches to social investment have been controversial. In late 2017, the new Labour-New Zealand First government announced a review of the previous government's policies. As ideas about social investment evolve, this book brings together leading academics, commentators and policy analysts from the public and private sectors to answer three big questions: How should social investment be defined and conceptualized?; How should it be put into practice?; In what policy domains can it be most productively applied?

As governments in New Zealand and abroad continue to explore how best to tackle major social problems, this book is essential for people seeking to understand social policy in the twenty-first century.

Contributors: Peter Alsop; Ben Apted; Jonathan Boston; Holly Briffa; Simon Chapple; Alex Collie; Isabelle Collins; Steffan Crausaz; Jo Cribb; Sir Michael Cullen; Killian Destremau; Elizabeth Eppel; Diane Garrett; Derek Gill; David Hanna; Gary Hawke; Sarah Hogan; Tim Hughes; Girol Karacaoglu; Gail Kelly; Michael Mintrom; Graham Scott; Verna Smith; Simon Wakeman; Peter Wilson; Amanda Wolf; John Yeabsley; and Warren Young.
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About the author

Jonathan Boston is a Professor of Public Policy in the School of Government at the Victoria University of Wellington. He has written extensively on public management, the welfare state, child poverty, climate change policy, tertiary education funding, and comparative government.

Derek Gill is a Principal Economist at the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research, and a Senior Associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. His previous experience spans work in the public and private not-for-profit sectors and included roles as a general manager in a service delivery organisation, with the OECD and central agencies in New Zealand; he has also been a diplomat and policy adviser. Derek has served as a long-standing board chair and treasurer for a number of voluntary organisations.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Dec 4, 2017
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Pages
500
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ISBN
9781988533551
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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What Truth Sounds Like exists at the tense intersection of the conflict between politics and prophecy – of whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape. The future of race and democracy hang in the balance.

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