Holy Nation: The Transatlantic Quaker Ministry in an Age of Revolution

University of Chicago Press
Free sample

Early American Quakers have long been perceived as retiring separatists, but in Holy Nation Sarah Crabtree transforms our historical understanding of the sect by drawing on the sermons, diaries, and correspondence of Quakers themselves. Situating Quakerism within the larger intellectual and religious undercurrents of the Atlantic World, Crabtree shows how Quakers forged a paradoxical sense of their place in the world as militant warriors fighting for peace. She argues that during the turbulent Age of Revolution and Reaction, the Religious Society of Friends forged a “holy nation,” a transnational community of like-minded believers committed first and foremost to divine law and to one another. Declaring themselves citizens of their own nation served to underscore the decidedly unholy nature of the nation-state, worldly governments, and profane laws. As a result, campaigns of persecution against the Friends escalated as those in power moved to declare Quakers aliens and traitors to their home countries.

Holy Nation convincingly shows that ideals and actions were inseparable for the Society of Friends, yielding an account of Quakerism that is simultaneously a history of the faith and its adherents and a history of its confrontations with the wider world. Ultimately, Crabtree argues, the conflicts experienced between obligations of church and state that Quakers faced can illuminate similar contemporary struggles.
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About the author

Sarah Crabtree is assistant professor of history at San Francisco State University.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Jul 13, 2015
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780226255934
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
History / United States / 19th Century
History / United States / Colonial Period (1600-1775)
Religion / Christianity / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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