How to Live in a Flat

Vintage Words of Wisdom

Book 16
RHE Media Limited
Free sample

'How to Live in a Flat', if posed as a question, is worth asking today with so many articles on tiny flats with hugely inflated price tags in the newspapers. Flat-dwellers were faced with very similar problems in 1936. During 1932 and 1933 Heath Robinson had drawn a series of cartoons for 'The Sketch' entitled ‘Flat Life’, which depicted various gadgets designed to make the most of the limited space available in the contemporary flat. It was this series of drawings that provided K. R. G. Browne and W. Heath Robinson with the inspiration for their first full-length book together. It was called 'How to Live in a Flat' and, as well as greatly extending the original ideas showing many ingenious ways of overcoming the problems caused by lack of space in flats and bungalows, the book also provided much fun at the expense of the more extreme designs in thirties furniture and architecture. The book was published for Christmas 1936 and was well received. 'How to Live in a Flat' is surprisingly relevant to life in Britain in 2014. In fact, several of Heath Robinson’s space-economising solutions have been used in practice to maximise the use of space in small flats. We have beds that fold down from wardrobes fully-made and ready to sleep in, communal rubbish shoots, central heating and multi-purpose furniture. So Heath Robinson was way ahead of his time and reading 'How to Live in a Flat' may spark other innovative solutions to making life bearable in a tiny twenty-first century home! If, in addition to being a flat-dweller (perhaps in a garden flat), you are also married with a car and you play golf then you will find much to amuse and inform you in our other titles by Heath Robinson and K. R. G. Browne: • How to be a Perfect Husband • How to Make a Garden Grow • How to be a Motorist • Humours of Golf All our Heath Robinson titles include a Foreword by Geoffrey Beare, Trustee of the William Heath Robinson Trust, who is working to build a Heath Robinson museum in North London.
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Additional Information

Publisher
RHE Media Limited
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Published on
Nov 14, 2014
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9781910226254
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Language
English
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Genres
Humor / Form / Pictorial
Humor / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Keeping chickens is a very popular hobby today but it was just as popular in 1918, albeit for different reasons. In the early twentieth century keeping chickens was often a money-making enterprise that anyone with a small amount of land could undertake. However, it is clear from Poultry Keeping that taking care to look after chickens and other poultry properly was vital, whether for profit or pleasure. Although this Vintage Words of Wisdom title is often amusing and quaint, the advice given is provided by acknowledged experts and it stands the test of time. There are wise words here on keeping chickens clean, well-fed and healthy, with regular reminders that chickens need space and time to scratch and forage for food themselves in order to stay well and productive. This is in a time before battery hens were crowded into tiny cages with no room to stretch their wings or have a dust bath. The authors provide advice on building a chicken coop, detailed menus for feeding chickens through the year and a chapter on the various diseases and ailments of poultry. The authors also provide guidance on the breeds of chickens to buy for different purposes – egg-laying, chickens for eating, showing, etc. – breeding and care of chicks, showing chickens (which was very popular in 1918), the business side of poultry-keeping, as well as advice on keeping other poultry such as ducks, geese, turkeys and guinea fowl (though the authors do not recommend keeping ostriches!). The illustrations are charming as well as informative, the text is engaging and describes a world in 1918 that is sometimes familiar and at other times very different. From Orpingtons to silkies, Poultry Keeping offers timeless wisdom on raising chickens from egg to adult bird. We heartily recommend this book as an enjoyable and nostalgic read for anyone who has chickens, or who is thinking of keeping chickens as a hobby or as a backyard business.
Most will agree that the advances made in aviation in little more than a century are remarkable. What was once a dramatic, and often perilous, adventure has become ubiquitous and a barely acknowledged part of modern life. But in 1912, when The Boys’ Book of Aeroplanes was published, only nine years had elapsed since the Wright brothers made their first flight at Kittyhawk on 7 December 1903. Although many had attempted to fly, devising plans for all manner of craft, and much success with balloons, gliders and airships had been achieved, it was in this first decade of the twentieth century that the real practical issues were confronted and overcome, and this enabled controlled, sustained, powered, heavier-than-air flight to begin. In this Vintage Words of Wisdom title, one of the earliest aeroplane books written for enthusiastic boys (but, we suspect, also having a strong appeal for the more mature reader), the authors chart the history of flight in considerable detail. From Oliver of Malmesbury in 1065 to Clement Ader, via Leonardo da Vinci, the famous and some now forgotten pioneers are given their place in the development of flight. The authors also provide a description of the sensation of flying based on their own experience and they attempt to place the reader in the pilot’s seat. This is wonderfully evocative, given the risks then prevalent in these earliest of flying machines, and highlights the intrepid and pioneering characteristics required of the aviators. The science of flight is not disregarded and there is a wealth of detail on the fundamentals of how and why aircraft fly and also on the engineering and mechanics necessary to build a successful aircraft. The text is supported by numerous drawings and a wealth of period photographs that evoke the enthusiasm and demonstrate the courage of these flying trailblazers. We think The Boys’ Book of Aeroplanes will appeal not just to the aviation enthusiast but also to anyone interested in the impact that aviation has had upon the world in the last hundred years. The principles outlined remain relevant today and the historical account provides a context for the development of aviation through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The book is an authoritative tour de horizon for all things aeronautical at the dawn of powered flight.
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This Vintage Words of Wisdom title, published in 1912, provides us with a charming evocation of life on an English smallholding at the beginning of the twentieth century. Describing the farming year month by month, The Cottage Farm offers us a vivid picture of the daily challenges and joys the author, Mr Green, experiences. There are moments of humour and sadness, protests about government policy and the behaviour of the local hunt, as well as reflections on the natural world. The author often faces hardship and this certainly wasn’t the Good Life. However, he also enjoys the many compensations of a self-sufficient rural existence. The smallholding is actually not that small, nor is it a hobby farm, for Mr Green grows a wide range of crops, orchard fruit, soft fruit and vegetables, and he has cows (his beloved Kerries), chickens (White Orpingtons), pigs and bees. He is ably supported by Tommy the cart horse, Two Bob the dog and the curmudgeonly and picaresque Snowey, whose lurchers ‘have a nose for a rabbit’. This charming book is full of practical advice and words of wisdom. Mr Green tells us about profitable varieties of fruit and vegetables, how to look after chickens in order to get them to lay well, and proffers advice on fertilizer, caring for bees in winter and many other things besides. The Cottage Farm is for all those who enjoy the rural life and those who hanker after moving to the country, having their own smallholding and achieving practical self-sufficiency. It is also perfect for anyone who enjoys reading nostalgic descriptions of days gone by in the English countryside. We have illustrated the chapters with paintings that reflect rural life in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. As the book is short it won’t detain you long but it will leave a lasting impression of country lives lived in the golden years just before the First World War.
This Vintage Words of Wisdom title was first published in 1937. Ninety-nine years earlier, in 1838, the London and Birmingham Railway was opened: the first intercity railway into London with its terminus at Euston and providing a direct connection to Coventry, Birmingham and onwards to the North-West. This signalled an acceleration in the construction of railways and a period of railway mania that swept the country. As Cyril Andrews explains in The Railway Age, the age of steam trains brought about fundamental transformations to the nation. It changed the landscape, demanded new engineering and technological advances, opened up new opportunities for commerce and, perhaps most importantly, ushered in changes to society as people now had the means to travel further, faster and easier than ever before. The social impact of the railways is well covered. The author considers the effect upon the various strata of society and how railways improved the working lives of those like the commercial traveller, introduced the concept of the commuter and enabled those in want of entertainment. Apparently 15,000 people in 1848 travelled by train to Coventry to see a revival of Lady Godiva’s ride through the streets! Profusely illustrated with over 80 plates and photographs and accompanied by 50 line drawings and cartoons, The Railway Age takes a broad approach to railway history that considers more the impact and effect that railways had than just the technology of steam engines. So we read about the influence of Brunel, railway station architecture, railway hotels, speculators and the beginnings of the London underground, with the text interspersed with contemporary accounts, poetry and popular songs of the period. There are several lithographic plates by the famous early railway artist J.C. Bourne, as well as Punch cartoons, entries from The Comic Bradshaw and many other rare and fascinating images. Often amusing and surprising, The Railway Age is a welcome addition to the Vintage Words of Wisdom series and will appeal both to the railway enthusiast and to anyone with an interest in social history and, in particular, the effects of the industrialisation of Britain.
Keeping chickens is a very popular hobby today but it was just as popular in 1918, albeit for different reasons. In the early twentieth century keeping chickens was often a money-making enterprise that anyone with a small amount of land could undertake. However, it is clear from Poultry Keeping that taking care to look after chickens and other poultry properly was vital, whether for profit or pleasure. Although this Vintage Words of Wisdom title is often amusing and quaint, the advice given is provided by acknowledged experts and it stands the test of time. There are wise words here on keeping chickens clean, well-fed and healthy, with regular reminders that chickens need space and time to scratch and forage for food themselves in order to stay well and productive. This is in a time before battery hens were crowded into tiny cages with no room to stretch their wings or have a dust bath. The authors provide advice on building a chicken coop, detailed menus for feeding chickens through the year and a chapter on the various diseases and ailments of poultry. The authors also provide guidance on the breeds of chickens to buy for different purposes – egg-laying, chickens for eating, showing, etc. – breeding and care of chicks, showing chickens (which was very popular in 1918), the business side of poultry-keeping, as well as advice on keeping other poultry such as ducks, geese, turkeys and guinea fowl (though the authors do not recommend keeping ostriches!). The illustrations are charming as well as informative, the text is engaging and describes a world in 1918 that is sometimes familiar and at other times very different. From Orpingtons to silkies, Poultry Keeping offers timeless wisdom on raising chickens from egg to adult bird. We heartily recommend this book as an enjoyable and nostalgic read for anyone who has chickens, or who is thinking of keeping chickens as a hobby or as a backyard business.
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