Binding of Isaac and Messiah, The: Law, Martyrdom, and Deliverance in Early Rabbinic Religiosity

SUNY Press
8
Free sample

The author provides an interpretation of the words of Jews living during the intertestamental period and through the third century, including several hassidim. A hermeneutics grounded in the perception of early Rabbinic texts as sharing in events rather than as linguistically autonomous is used.

The phenomenology of Jewish martyrdom is read as an acting-out of the Binding of Isaac. The search leads into the question of the bindingness of the La. The The religious soul’s passion for the revelation of Law is followed out in its path of temptation to martyrdom. A grand drama of sacrifice and messianic yearnings is thereby unearthed.
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About the author

Aharon (Ronald E.) Agus is lecturer on rabbinic thinking at Bar-Ilan University in Ramat-Gan, Israel.

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3.9
8 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 1, 2012
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9780791494363
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Jewish
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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