Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Molecular and Cellular Biology

Springer Science & Business Media
2
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Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), caused by mutational inactivation of the NF1 tumour suppressor gene, is one of the most common dominantly inherited human disorders, affecting 1 in 3000 individuals worldwide. This book presents in concise fashion, but as comprehensively as possible, our current state of knowledge on the molecular genetics, molecular biology and cellular biology of this tumour predisposition syndrome.

Written by internationally recognized experts in the field, the 44 chapters that constitute this edited volume provide the reader with a broad overview of the clinical features of the disease, the structure and expression of the NF1 gene, its germ line and somatic mutational spectra and genotype-phenotype relationships, the structure and function of its protein product (neurofibromin), NF1 modifying loci, the molecular pathology of NF1-associated tumours, animal models of the disease, psycho-social aspects and future prospects for therapeutic treatment.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Jan 29, 2013
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Pages
717
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ISBN
9783642328640
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Clinical Medicine
Medical / Genetics
Medical / Neuroscience
Medical / Oncology
Medical / Research
Science / Life Sciences / Molecular Biology
Science / Life Sciences / Neuroscience
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels and is a key process which occurs during pathological disease progression. Excessive and damaging angiogenesis occurs in diseases such as cancer, diabetic retinopathies, age-related macular degeneration and atherosclerosis. In other diseases such as stroke and myocardial infarction, insufficient or improper angiogenesis results in tissue loss and ultimately higher morbidity and mortality. In this book we will begin by providing the reader with an overview of the process of angiogenesis including normal embryological development of blood vessels. The following chapters will each focus on a key angiogenic disease incorporating current scientific knowledge concerning the causes of activation of the “angiogenic switch”, pathological consequences, current treatment options and future perspectives. Where appropriate, results from pre-clinical trials, novel imaging modalities and nanotechnological approaches will be incorporated into these sections. Finally, since it is now believed that the process of angiogenesis operated via different signalling mechanisms in different vascular beds, we will discuss our current understanding of this phenomenon. The target audience for this book would include researchers in all the basic sciences; post-graduate students at Universities and Institutes; pharmaceutical industries; clinicians working in vascular biology or tissue imaging; pathologists; neurologists; tumour biologists; ophthalmologists and cardiologists.
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Was diabetes evolution's response to the last Ice Age? Did a deadly genetic disease help our ancestors survive the bubonic plagues of Europe? Will a visit to the tanning salon help lower your cholesterol? Why do we age? Why are some people immune to HIV? Can your genes be turned on -- or off?

Joining the ranks of modern myth busters, Dr. Sharon Moalem turns our current understanding of illness on its head and challenges us to fundamentally change the way we think about our bodies, our health, and our relationship to just about every other living thing on earth, from plants and animals to insects and bacteria.

Through a fresh and engaging examination of our evolutionary history, Dr. Moalem reveals how many of the conditions that are diseases today actually gave our ancestors a leg up in the survival sweepstakes. When the option is a long life with a disease or a short one without it, evolution opts for disease almost every time.

Everything from the climate our ancestors lived in to the crops they planted and ate to their beverage of choice can be seen in our genetic inheritance. But Survival of the Sickest doesn't stop there. It goes on to demonstrate just how little modern medicine really understands about human health, and offers a new way of thinking that can help all of us live longer, healthier lives.

Survival of the Sickest is filled with fascinating insights and cutting-edge research, presented in a way that is both accessible and utterly absorbing. This is a book about the interconnectedness of all life on earth -- and, especially, what that means for us.

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominantly inherited, tumour predisposition syndrome affecting 1/3,000-4,000 individuals worldwide. This inherited disorder results from the mutational inactivation of the NF1 gene on human chromosome 17. The NF1 gene contains 61 exons that give rise to 12kb mRNA encoding neurofibromin. The 327kDa (2,818 amino acid) neurofibromin protein is expressed in most tissues and has a number of alternative isoforms. Neurofibromin is a tumour suppressor protein and down-regulates cellular Ras. Increased active Ras-GTP levels also stimulate the important PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway that protects cells from apoptosis. The major clinical featues of NF1 include multiple café-au-lait macules, skinfold freckles, iris Lisch nodules, and neurofibromas. The diagnostic criteria for clinical diagnosis have been well established. However, there are a small number of cases in which the diagnosis is not certain. The germline mutation rate for the NF1 gene is 10-fold higher than that observed for most other inherited diseases. Using a combination of different techniques, almost 95% of germline mutations can be detected. To date, only two firm genotype phenotype correlations have been reported. NF1 phenotype exhibits large variations within a family, evidence for modifying loci regulating the expression of an NF1 gene is beginning to emerge. We also are gaining knowledge on the molecular mechanisms associated with the development of different types of tumours. It is encouraging that the results of recent laboratory and clinical research are finally being translated into clinical trials. With the availability of high-throughput technologies, sophisticated animal models, and multi-centre clinical trials, the future for NF1 sufferers is looking optimistic. This book aims to provide an overview of the genetic and clinical aspects of NF1 and its role in both NF1-associated and sporadic tumour development. It emphasizes the recent developments in this field and some of the promising on-going clinical trials.
"[Kolata] is a gifted storyteller. Her account of the Baxleys... is both engrossing and distressing... Kolata's book raises crucial questions about knowledge that can be both vital and fatal, both pallative and dangerous." —Andrew Solomon, The New York Review of Books

New York Times science reporter Gina Kolata follows a family through genetic illness and one courageous daughter who decides her fate shall no longer be decided by a genetic flaw.

The phone rings. The doctor from California is on the line. “Are you ready Amanda?” The two people Amanda Baxley loves the most had begged her not to be tested—at least, not now. But she had to find out.

If your family carried a mutated gene that foretold a brutal illness and you were offered the chance to find out if you’d inherited it, would you do it? Would you walk toward the problem, bravely accepting whatever answer came your way? Or would you avoid the potential bad news as long as possible?

In Mercies in Disguise, acclaimed New York Times science reporter and bestselling author Gina Kolata tells the story of the Baxleys, an almost archetypal family in a small town in South Carolina. A proud and determined clan, many of them doctors, they are struck one by one with an inscrutable illness. They finally discover the cause of the disease after a remarkable sequence of events that many saw as providential. Meanwhile, science, progressing for a half a century along a parallel track, had handed the Baxleys a resolution—not a cure, but a blood test that would reveal who had the gene for the disease and who did not. And science would offer another dilemma—fertility specialists had created a way to spare the children through an expensive process.

A work of narrative nonfiction, Mercies in Disguise is the story of a family that took matters into its own hands when the medical world abandoned them. It’s a story of a family that had to deal with unspeakable tragedy and yet did not allow it to tear them apart. And it is the story of a young woman—Amanda Baxley—who faced the future head on, determined to find a way to disrupt her family’s destiny.

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