Reason and Religion in Socratic Philosophy

Oxford University Press
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This volume brings together mostly previously unpublished studies by prominent historians, classicists, and philosophers on the roles and effects of religion in Socratic philosophy and on the trial of Socrates. Among the contributors are Thomas C. Brickhouse, Asli Gocer, Richard Kraut, Mark L. McPherran, Robert C. T. Parker, C. D. C. Reeve, Nicholas D. Smith, Gregory Vlastos, Stephen A. White, and Paul B. Woodruff.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
Nov 16, 2000
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9780195350920
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / History & Surveys / Ancient & Classical
Religion / Philosophy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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