Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

The New Press
3
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The “powerful” (Michelle Alexander) exploration—featured by The Atlantic, Essence, the Washington Post, New York magazine, NPR, and others—of the harsh and harmful experiences confronting Black girls in schools

In a work that Lisa Delpit calls “imperative reading,” Monique W. Morris (Black Stats, Too Beautiful for Words) chronicles the experiences of Black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Called “compelling” and “thought-provoking” by Kirkus Reviews, Pushout exposes a world of confined potential and supports the rising movement to challenge the policies, practices, and cultural illiteracy that push countless students out of school and into unhealthy, unstable, and often unsafe futures.

Called a book “for everyone who cares about children” by the Washington Post, Morris’s illumination of these critical issues is “timely and important” (Booklist) at a moment when Black girls are the fastest growing population in the juvenile justice system. Praised by voices as wide-ranging as Gloria Steinem and Roland Martin, and highlighted for the audiences of Elle and Jet right alongside those of EdWeek and the Leonard Lopate Show, Pushout is a book that “will stay with you long after you turn the final page” (Bookish).

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About the author

Monique W. Morris is co-founder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute and is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century. She lives in the Bay Area with her husband and two daughters.
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Additional Information

Publisher
The New Press
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Published on
Jan 16, 2018
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Pages
146
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ISBN
9781620974131
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Multicultural Education
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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