Negotiating Ethnicity: The Impact of Anthropological Theory and Practice

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NAPA Bulletin is a peer reviewed occasional publication of the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology, dedicated to the practical problem-solving and policy applications of anthropological knowledge and methods.
  • peer reviewed publication of the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology
  • dedicated to the practical problem-solving and policy applications of anthropological knowledge and methods
  • most editions available for course adoption
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About the author

Volume Editor: Susan Emley Keefe

General Editors: Ralph J. Bishop and Pamela Amoss

Susan Emley Keefe received her Ph.D. in 1974 from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and is Professor of Anthropology at Appalachian State University. Her scholarly work has been interdisciplinary and has combined theoretical and applied interests, primarily in ethnicity, mental health, and education. She is the co-author (with Amado M. Padilla) of Chicano Ethnicity (University of New Mexico Press 1987) and editor of Appalachian Mental Health (University Press of Kentucky 1988). Her current research is on ethnicity as it is expressed among black and white Appalachians and its impact on education and mental health.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Apr 22, 2009
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Pages
48
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ISBN
9781444307023
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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