Taking Risks: Feminist Activism and Research in the Americas

SUNY Press
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Explores activist scholarship in relation to feminist
and social movements in the Americas.


Taking Risks offers a
creative, interdisciplinary approach to narrating the stories of activist
scholarship by women. The essays are based on the textual analysis of
interviews, oral histories, ethnography, video storytelling, and theater. The
contributors come from many disciplinary backgrounds, including theater,
history, literature, sociology, feminist studies, and cultural studies. The
topics range from the underground library movement in Cuba, femicide in Juárez,
community radio in Venezuela, video archives in Colombia, exiled feminists in
Canada, memory activism in Argentina, sex worker activists in Brazil, rural
feminists in Nicaragua, to domestic violence organizations for Latina immigrants
in Texas. Each essay addresses two themes: telling stories and taking risks. The
authors understand women activists across the Americas as storytellers who,
along with the authors themselves, work to fill the Latin American and Caribbean
studies archives with histories of resistance. In addition to sharing the
activists’ stories, the contributors weave in discussions of scholarly risk
taking to speak to the challenges and importance of elevating the storytellers
and their histories.

“Julie Shayne took a risk with this book, and the
result is impressive: By challenging the activism-research divide that US
academies so often sustain, the authors in this collection challenge
epistemological as well as national, race, class, age, and gender boundaries.
Taking Risks is a must read for researchers and students alike!” — Amy
Lind, editor of Development, Sexual Rights, and Global Governance
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About the author

Julie Shayne is Lecturer in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell and Affiliate Associate Professor of Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Washington Seattle. She is the author of They Used to Call Us Witches: Chilean Exiles, Culture, and Feminism and The Revolution Question: Feminisms in El Salvador, Chile, and Cuba.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2014
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Pages
385
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ISBN
9781438452470
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Latin America / South America
History / North America
Law / Jurisprudence
Political Science / Human Rights
Political Science / Political Process / Political Advocacy
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Discrimination & Race Relations
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Minority Studies
Social Science / Feminism & Feminist Theory
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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