Behind the Mask: Gender Hybridity in a Zapotec Community

University of Arizona Press
Free sample

The image of biologically male people dancing while dressed in the traditional, colorful attire of Zapotec, Juchiteca, females stands in sharp contrast to the prevailing view of Mexico as the land of charros, machismo, and unbridled ranchero masculinity. These indigenous people are called los muxes, and they are neither man nor woman, but rather a hybrid third gender.

After seeing a video of a muxe vela, or festival, sociologist Alfredo Mirandé was intrigued by the contradiction between Mexico’s patriarchal reputation and its warm acceptance of los muxes. Seeking to get past traditional Mexican masculinity, he presents us with Behind the Mask, which combines historical analysis, ethnographic field research, and interviews conducted with los muxes of Juchitán over a period of seven years. Mirandé observed community events, attended muxe velas, and interviewed both muxes and other Juchitán residents. Prefaced by an overview of the study methods and sample, the book challenges the ideology of a male-dominated Mexican society driven by the cult of machismo, featuring photos alongside four appendixes.

Delving into many aspects of their lives and culture, the author discusses how the muxes are perceived by others, how the muxes perceive themselves, and the acceptance of a third gender status among various North American indigenous groups. Mirandé compares traditional Mexicano/Latino conceptions of gender and sexuality to modern or Western object choice configurations. He concludes by proposing a new hybrid model for rethinking these seemingly contradictory and conflicting gender systems.
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About the author

A native of Mexico City, Alfredo Mirandé is distinguished professor of sociology and ethnic studies at the University of California, Riverside. He is the author of many articles in academic journals and nine books, including La Chicana: The Mexican-American Woman (co-authored with Evangelina Enríquez), Jalos, USA: Transnational Community and Identity, Rascuache Lawyer: Toward a Theory of Ordinary Litigation, and Hombres y Machos: Masculinity and Latino Culture.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Arizona Press
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Published on
Mar 21, 2017
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9780816536252
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Gender Studies
Social Science / General
Social Science / Indigenous Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Winner, 2018 RBC Taylor Prize
Winner, 2017 Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing
Winner, First Nation Communities Read Indigenous Literature Award
Finalist, 2017 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction
Finalist, 2017 Speaker’s Book Award
Finalist, 2018 B.C. National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction
A Globe And Mail Top 100 Book
A National Post 99 Best Book Of The Year

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