White-Collar and Corporate Crime: A Documentary and Reference Guide

ABC-CLIO
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From Gilded Age railroad scandals to the muckraking period and from the Savings and Loan debacle to corporate fallout during the recent economic meltdown, some individuals and companies have chosen to take the low road to achieve "the American dream." While these offenders throughout modern history may have lacked ethics, morals, or good judgment, they certainly were not wanting in terms of creativity.

White-Collar and Corporate Crime: A Documentary and Reference Guide traces the fascinating history of white-collar and corporate criminal behavior from the 1800s through the 2010 passage of the Dodd-Frank financial reform measure. Author Gilbert Geis scrutinizes more than a century of episodes involving corporate corruption and other self-serving behaviors that violate antitrust laws, bribery statutes, and fraud laws. The various attempts made by authorities to rein in greed and the methods employed by wrongdoers to evade these controls are also discussed and evaluated.

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About the author

Gilbert Geis is professor emeritus in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at University of California, Irvine, CA.

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Additional Information

Publisher
ABC-CLIO
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Published on
Oct 31, 2011
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Pages
351
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ISBN
9780313380549
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Corporate & Business History
Political Science / General
True Crime / White Collar Crime
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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