Alice Freeman Palmer

Houghton, Mifflin
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Houghton, Mifflin
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 1908
Read more
Collapse
Pages
354
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
"In undertaking the following discussion I foresee two grave difficulties. My reader may well feel that goodness is already the most familiar of all the thoughts we employ, and yet he may at the same time suspect that there is something about it perplexingly abstruse and remote. Familiar it certainly is. It attends all our wishes, acts, and projects as nothing else does, so that no estimate of its influence can be excessive." -From the PrefaceThe concept of "goodness" is a timeless predicament. Philosophers to modern neuroscientists have yet to decipher the source of man's innate goodness. In fact, George H. Palmer's own constant quest to comprehend and appreciate what made people behave the way they continues to fascinate contemporary fans of philosophy to this day.Originally delivered as a slate of lectures at Harvard, Dartmouth and Wellesley Colleges during the early twentieth century and published in book form in 1903, the core of the essays here include: . The Double Affect of Goodness, . Misconceptions of Goodness, . Self-Consciousness, . Self-Direction, . Self-Development, . Self-Sacrifice, . Nature and Spirit, and, . The Three Stages of Goodness.As a pioneering educator and American philosopher, GEORGE HERBERT PALMER (1842-1933), was educated at Harvard (1864) and Andover Theological Seminary (1870). He became a Greek tutor at Harvard in 1870 and eventually earning the status of professor emeritus and overseer from 1913-1919. Notably, Palmer was the first Harvard lecturer to discard the textbook model of teaching philosophy by using his own philosophical approach in lectures. Other works include The Life and Works of George Herbert (1905), The Field of Ethics (1901), and Altruism: Its Nature and Varieties (1919).
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.