Life on Matagorda Island

Gulf Coast Studies

Book 5
Texas A&M University Press
Free sample

"When Wayne and Martha McAlister moved to Matagorda Island, a wildlife refuge off the central Texas coast, they anticipated staying perhaps five years. But sent to take up duties with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wayne McAlister fell under the island's spell the moment he stepped out of his aging house trailer and met his first Matagorda rattlesnake. Seven years later, the McAlisters were still observing the flora and fauna of Matagorda. Except for the road and some occasional fence posts, the island appears untouched by humans. In Life on Matagorda Island, Wayne McAlister shows what life was like amid such isolation."--Jacket.
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About the author

McAlister is a retired professor of biology at Victoria College. Wayne worked as an environmental education specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for ten years.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Texas A&M University Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2004
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Pages
244
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ISBN
9781603446419
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Regional
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Galveston Bay is the recreational center of the Texas coast--a fishing, boating and birdwatching playground for the almost four million people who live on or near it. A shallow estuary of about 350,000 acres, the bay supports a rich assortment of wildlife and a commercial fishery that pulls millions of pounds of crabs, shrimp, and oysters from the water each year. Gateway to the Port of Houston, Galveston Bay is also a major corridor for huge volumes of international shipping and is home to the nation's largest petrochemical manufacturing complex. How can such divergent and apparently contradictory activities all coexist? Setting out to find some answers, Sally Antrobus has produced a book for residents and visitors alike that tunes them in to what is happening in, on, and to the bay--the book she wished for when she first came to live nearby. Beginning with a short, incisive history of the peopling of the area, Antrobus describes how the bay works ecologically and how it is put to work, for recreation and for commerce; how nature both contributes to and controls the human enterprise there; and how power and politics can destroy all the bay has to offer.
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All those who love outdoor Texas will relish this delightful celebration of spring and enjoy the artwork of Ralph Scott, who has done an illustration of each spring herald.
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