Scout's Honor: A Novel

SUNY Press
1
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A scout’s iconoclastic views of basketball, love, and American culture.

Brimming with truth, humor, and humanity, bestselling author Charley Rosen lays bare the trials and tribulations of anyone who loves sports for the game of it, not the business.

Naturally sarcastic, a touch disillusioned, but always the idealist, Rob Lassner is an NBA scout who must assess the potential of high school and college players while appeasing a “shit-for-brains” owner who wouldn’t know a crosscourt pass if it knocked the silver spoon out of his blathering mouth.

Scout’s Honor is the story of one man’s attempt to balance his love for the purity of basketball with the below-the-rim bullshit side of the game that pays his bills. With charming irreverence and colorful prose, Rosen’s novel is steeped in both literary richness and the art of the jump shot.
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About the author

Charley Rosen is the coauthor with Phil Jackson of Maverick (1975) and the New York Times bestseller More Than A Game (2001). As a player at Hunter College, Rosen set numerous scoring records and has subsequently coached several teams in the Continental Basketball League. He has a Master’s degree in Medieval Literature and has written more than a hundred articles for publications ranging from the New York Times Book Review to Men’s Journal, plus thousands of pieces for several sports websites. His previously published books include six novels and twelve works of nonfiction. He lives with his wife, Daia, in upstate New York.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Mar 1, 2013
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Pages
229
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ISBN
9781438446851
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Sports
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The 1980s were arguably the NBA's best decade, giving rise to Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, and Michael Jordan. They were among the game's greatest players who brought pro basketball out of its 1970s funk and made it faster, more fluid, and more exciting. Off the court the game was changing rapidly too, with the draft lottery, shoe commercials, and a style driven largely by excess.

One player who personified the eighties excess is Micheal Ray Richardson. During his eight-year career in the NBA (1978-86), he was a four-time All-Star, twice named to the All-Defense team, and the first player to lead the league in both assists and steals. He was also a heavy cocaine user who went on days-long binges but continued to be signed by teams that hoped he'd get straight. Eventually he was the first and only player to be permanently disqualified from the NBA for repeat drug use.

Tracking the rise, fall, and eventual redemption of Richardson throughout his playing days and subsequent coaching career, Charley Rosen describes the life‑defining pitfalls Richardson and other players faced and considers key themes such as off‑court and on‑court racism, anti-Semitism, womanizing, allegations of point‑shaving within the league, and drug and alcohol abuse by star players.

By constructing his various lines of narration around the polarizing figure of Richardson--equal parts basketball savant, drug addict, and pariah--Rosen illuminates some of the more unseemly aspects of the NBA during this period, going behind the scenes to provide an account of what the league's darker side was like during its celebrated golden age.
Charles Rosen is one of the world's most talented pianists -- and one of music's most astute commentators. Known as a performer of Bach, Beethoven, Stravinsky, and Elliott Carter, he has also written highly acclaimed criticism for sophisticated students and professionals.

In Piano Notes, he writes for a broader audience about an old friend -- the piano itself. Drawing upon a lifetime of wisdom and the accumulated lore of many great performers of the past, Rosen shows why the instrument demands such a stark combination of mental and physical prowess. Readers will gather many little-known insights -- from how pianists vary their posture, to how splicings and microphone placements can ruin recordings, to how the history of composition was dominated by the piano for two centuries. Stories of many great musicians abound. Rosen reveals Nadia Boulanger's favorite way to avoid commenting on the performances of her friends ("You know what I think," spoken with utmost earnestness), why Glenn Gould's recordings suffer from "double-strike" touches, and how even Vladimir Horowitz became enamored of splicing multiple performances into a single recording. Rosen's explanation of the piano's physical pleasures, demands, and discontents will delight and instruct anyone who has ever sat at a keyboard, as well as everyone who loves to listen to the instrument.

In the end, he strikes a contemplative note. Western music was built around the piano from the classical era until recently, and for a good part of that time the instrument was an essential acquisition for every middle-class household. Music making was part of the fabric of social life. Yet those days have ended. Fewer people learn the instrument today. The rise of recorded music has homogenized performance styles and greatly reduced the frequency of public concerts. Music will undoubtedly survive, but will the supremely physical experience of playing the piano ever be the same?
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