Images of Women in Maharashtrian Literature and Religion

SUNY Press
10
Free sample

The essays investigate the images of women and femininity found in the traditions of the Marathi language region of India, Maharashtra, and how these images contradict the actualities of women's lives.

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About the author

Anne Feldhaus is Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Arizona State University.

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3.2
10 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Pages
281
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ISBN
9781438402499
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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This interdisciplinary book looks at women`s natural resource-based livelihoods in the wider context of development viewed through the lens of citizenship rights. Unravelling the patriarchal social fabric and policy structures in India, it argues that the concept of citizenship needs to be extended to include recognition of ways of life and livelihood, so that women take their legitimate space as productive human beings, entitled to dignity as a political right, and not merely to protection and welfare.

The editor weaves together a historical perspective on varied dimensions of livelihood, development and citizenship. Drawing upon rich field-based researches in 13 states across India, the authors deal with complex and inter-related themes: the need to recognise women`s right to resources and their livelihood and employment strategies; the challenges of democratic governance and of restructuring institutional systems to make them responsive; and the role of women`s collective agency in development.
Reflecting upon and critically analysing context-specific issues in several less-studied locations, the book shows that there is much to be learnt from empathetic interaction with the collective struggles of poor women, and from action and dialogue on the ground. Further, it suggests that feminist politics has to network strategically with other struggles to counter the resistance of traditional and contemporary patriarchal structures, and to work towards recasting citizenship for a gender-just development that ensures women`s livelihood rights.
Globalisation, like no other term, has gained in recent years a prominent position in nearly all branches of social science. Consequently, its definitions abound, also in economics -- a discipline to which it has a special relevance. In economic terms, Globalisation is the historical process of gradual, yet persistent liberalisation followed by the coalescence of the hitherto largely fragmented markets of goods, capital and labour into a single global market. The concurrent regional integration processes, should by no means be seen as a trend opposed to Globalisation, which they may even facilitate in some circumstances by moving integration to a higher level: from that of national economics up to that of international organisations, for instance, the EU integrating with NAFTA, ASEAN with CIS or Mercosur with Caricom. Thus defined Globalisation depends on a variety of circumstances and has numerous implications. It is an extremely dynamic and complex process which, therefore, allows of no unambiguous assessment. Globalisation is an irreversible process, although -- as the experience of the last two or three years has shown -- its progress can be significantly impeded in the short run by various kinds of political and economic shocks. So the idea is to follow an enlightened and wise development strategy and a well-co-ordinated policy -- in this case, on the international and global scale -- that would minimise the attendant problems and eliminate, as far as possible, the concomitant social stress. How to achieve this goal is the question the authors address in this volume.
Bill Cooper, former United States Naval Intelligence Briefing Team member, reveals information that remains hidden from the public eye. This information has been kept in Top Secret government files since the 1940s. His audiences hear the truth unfold as he writes about the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the war on drugs, the Secret Government and UFOs. 


Bill is a lucid, rational and powerful speaker who intent is to inform and to empower his audience. Standing room only is normal. His presentation and information transcend partisan affiliations as he clearly addresses issues in a way that has a striking impact on listeners of all backgrounds and interests. He has spoken to many groups throughout the United States and has appeared regularly on many radio talk shows and on television. In 1988 Bill decided to "talk" due to events then taking place worldwide, events which he had seen plans for back in the early '70s. Since Bill has been "talking," he has correctly predicted the lowering of the Iron Curtain, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the invasion of Panama. All Bill's predictions were on record well before the events occurred. Bill is not a psychic. His information comes from Top Secret documents that he read while with the Intelligence Briefing Team and from over 17 years of thorough research. 


"Bill Cooper is the world's leading expert on UFOs." — Billy Goodman, KVEG, Las Vegas. 


"The only man in America who has all the pieces to the puzzle that has troubled so many for so long." — Anthony Hilder, Radio Free America 


"William Cooper may be one of America's greatest heroes, and this story may be the biggest story in the history of the world." — Mills Crenshaw, KTALK, Salt Lake City. 


"Like it or not, everything is changing. The result will be the most wonderful experience in the history of man or the most horrible enslavement that you can imagine. Be active or abdicate, the future is in your hands." — William Cooper, October 24, 1989.

Poverty in rural India: Is this a permanent condition? Are villagers immobilized by a rigid caste system, limited resources and economic exploitation? This book is about villagers who have done remarkable things with their lives—people who have broken the constraints of poverty and inequality to become innovative and mobile. It is written partly by one villager who found a career doing research on social change.

Inside–Outside narrates stories of grassroots change and innovation. These stories are discussed from the combined view of an insider (Baviskar), who grew up in a village in western India, and an outsider (Attwood), who came to study social change in the same region. Telling life stories from people who taught and surprised them, they challenge common stereotypes about Indian villagers—stereotypes of passivity, fatalism, and stagnation.

Baviskar’s life and experience of change in his home village exemplify grassroots initiative and innovation. He was born as the son of an impoverished farmer in a drought-stricken village in western Maharashtra. Ability, hard work, and some dramatic twists of fate enabled him to attend college and then complete a doctorate in India’s premier sociology department. In contrast to Baviskar, Attwood is a complete outsider, having grown up in a suburb near Chicago, in the US heartland. He stumbled into anthropology and spent several years in India, doing fieldwork in the region where Baviskar grew up. The two met in 1969; they became friends and began four decades of collaborative research.

Here they tell the stories of villagers who changed their own lives and who also, in many cases, changed the lives of others. These stories describe rapid innovation and institution-building in the countryside, challenging an array of common stereotypes about village life in India. Seeking explanations for change, it helps to look at village life from many angles. Inside and outside views are complementary and provide a more complete picture.
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