Shareholder Democracies?: Corporate Governance in Britain and Ireland before 1850

University of Chicago Press
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Understanding the challenges of corporate governance is central to our comprehension of the economic dynamics driving corporations today. Among the most important institutions in capitalism today, corporations and joint-stock companies had their origins in Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. And as they became more prevalent, the issue of internal governance became more pressing. At stake—and very much contested—was the allocation of rights and obligations among shareholders, directors, and managers.

This comprehensive account of the development of corporate governance in Britain and Ireland during its earliest stages highlights the role of political factors in shaping the evolution of corporate governance as well as the important debates that arose about the division of authority and responsibility. Political and economic institutions confronted similar issues, including the need for transparency and accountability in decision making and the roles of electors and the elected, and this book emphasizes how political institutions—from election procedures to assemblies to annual reporting—therefore provided apt models upon which companies drew readily. Filling a gap in the literature on early corporate economy, this book provides insight into the origins of many ongoing modern debates.
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About the author

Mark Freeman is a senior lecturer in economic and social history at the University of Glasgow, an associate member of the Centre for Business History in Scotland, and the author of several books, including Social Investigation and Rural England, 1870–1914. Robin Pearson is professor of economic history at the University of Hull and the author of Insuring the Industrial Revolution. James Taylor is a senior lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Lancaster and the author of Creating Capitalism.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Dec 12, 2011
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Pages
360
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ISBN
9780226261881
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economic History
Business & Economics / General
History / Europe / Great Britain / General
History / Europe / Ireland
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This content is DRM protected.
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