Print Culture and Music in Sixteenth-Century Venice

Oxford University Press
Free sample

This volume discusses the commerce of music and its connection to the printing and publishing industry in mid-sixteenth century Venice. Music printers occupied a unique niche in the Renaissance printing world because their product appealed to those with sophisticated taste and was not readable by the entire literate public. Bridging the gap between music and other disciplines, Bernstein demonstrates here that the role of a music printer can be discussed as part of the larger cultural and economic question of the success of a commercial enterprise.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Jane A. Bernstein is Professor of Music at Tufts University. She is the author of The Complete Works of Philip Van Wilder, Masters and Monuments of the Renaissance, and Ethel Smyth: Mass in D, as well as numerous articles.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Jul 19, 2001
Read more
Collapse
Pages
256
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780195349702
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Business & Economics / Industries / Manufacturing
Music / History & Criticism
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Ephemeral, fragile, often left unbound, sixteenth-century songbooks led fleeting lives in the pockets of singers and on the music desks of instrumentalists. Constantly in action, they were forever being used up, replaced, or abandoned as ways of reading changed. As such they document the acts of early musicians and the practices of everyday life at the unseen margins of elite society. Materialities is a cultural history of song on the page. It addresses a series of central questions concerning the audiences for written music by concentrating on the first genre to be commercialized by music printers: the French chanson. Scholars have long stressed that chansons represent the most broadly disseminated polyphony of the sixteenth century, but Materialities is the first book to account for the cultural reach of the chanson across a considerable cross-section of European society. Musicologist Kate van Orden brings extensive primary research and new analytical models to bear in this remarkable history of songbooks, music literacy, and social transformation during the first century of music printing. By tracking chansons into private libraries and schoolrooms and putting chansonniers into dialogue with catechisms, civility manuals, and chapbooks, Materialities charts the social distribution of songbooks, the gradual moralization of song, and the ways children learned their letters and notes. Its fresh conclusions revise several common assumptions about the value early moderns attributed to printed music, the levels of literacy required to perform polyphony, and the way musicians did or did not "read" their songbooks. With musical perspectives that can invigorate studies of print culture and the history of reading, Materialities is an essential guide for musicologists working with original sources and historians of the book interested in the vocal performances that operated alongside print.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.