Notable Women in Mathematics: A Biographical Dictionary

Greenwood Publishing Group
Free sample

This volume features substantive biographical essays on 59 women from around the world who have made significant contributions to mathematics from antiquity to the present. Designed for secondary school students and the general public, each profile describes major life events, obstacles faced and overcome, educational and career milestones--including a discussion of mathematical research in non-technical terms--and interests outside of 2 promotics. Although the collection includes historical women, the emphasis is on contemporary mathematicians, many of whom have not been profiled in any previous work. The work also celebrates the contributions of minority women, including 10 African-American, Latina, and Asian mathematicians.

Written by practicing mathematicians, teachers and researchers, these profiles give voice to the variety of pathways into mathematics that women have followed and the diversity of areas in which mathematics can work. Many profiles draw on interviews with the subject, and each includes a short list of suggested reading by and about the mathematician. Most mathematicians profiled stress the value, importance, and enjoyment of collaborative research, contradicting the prevailing notion that doing good mathematics requires isolation. This collection provides not only a substantial number of role models for girls interested in a career in mathematics, but also a unique depiction of a field that can offer a lifetime of challenge and enjoyment.

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About the author

CHARLENE MORROW is Co-Director of SummerMath, a six-week program for high school girls at Mount Holyoke College, past president and current co-Executive Director of Women and Mathematics Education, and Chair of the Comprehensive Mathematics Education for Every Child Committee of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. She has presented and written extensively on effective learning approaches and educational environments for girls and women.

TERI PERL is a consultant in education and technology with Teri Perl Associates. She is the author of two highly acclaimed books on women and mathematics, Math Equals (1978) and Women and Numbers (1993), and has also written a number of other educational books and materials for teachers. As co-founder of The Learning Company, Dr. Perl helped create several award-winning software packages in mathematics education and continues to be involved in teacher development at both the pre-service and in-service levels.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Greenwood Publishing Group
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Published on
Dec 31, 1998
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Pages
302
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ISBN
9780313291319
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Women
Science / Physics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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