Property and Protection: Essays in Honour of Brian W. Harvey

Bloomsbury Publishing
2
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This collection of essays is dedicated to Brian Harvey,the retired Professor of Property Law at the University of Birmingham. The contributions reflect his eclectic interests and bring new insights to issues of property law, both real and personal, consumer protection, auction sales and tax. Historical, human rights, public law, European Community and international aspects are addressed in addition to persistent domestic conveyancing concerns.

Contributors: Peter Cook, David Feldman, Jonathan Harris, Tim Kaye, Jeremy McBride, Frank Meisel, Norman Palmer, Deborah Parry, David Salter, Carla Shapreau, John Stevens, Mark Thompson, Nick Wikeley and John Wylie.
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About the author

Peter Cook is a Lecturer in Law at the University of Birmingham.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Dec 15, 2000
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Pages
347
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ISBN
9781847312334
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Property
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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